All SHCY members receive the Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth. Published three times a year, it features scholarly research and critical book reviews.

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Feb  11

2016 Outreach Grant Winners Announced

The successful applicants for the 2016 Outreach Grants are:

$500.00 Grant
Conference, submitted by Dr. Gulay Yilmaz, Akdeniz University
Title: “History of Childhood in the Ottoman Empire,”
6-7 May 2016 at Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey

$1,500 Grant
Symposium, submitted by Dr. Kristine Moruzi, Deakin University
Title: “Literary, Cultural, Social: (Re) Examining Historical Childhoods – An Australasian Society for the History of Children and Youth Symposium,”
7-8 November 2016 at Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia

Congratulations to the applicants and best of luck with your events!
SHCY Outreach Committee:
Luke Springman (chair), Adriana Benzaquen, David Pomfret, Shurlee Swain

Feb  08

Call for Nominations: Fass-Sandin Prize for Best Article (English)

The Society for the History of Children and Youth (SHCY) is pleased to call for nominations for the best article in English on the history of children, childhood, or youth (broadly construed) published in 2015 in a print or online journal. The prize consists of a plaque and a check for $250. The winner will be announced no later than mid-August.
Nominations are invited from publishers, editors, scholars, and authors. Current members of the SHCY award committee are ineligible.

CORRECTION (2/8/16): Please note that current officers of the Society, including Executive Committee, ARE ELIGIBLE for nominations.

Send a PDF or photocopy of the article to Sarah Emily Duff at sarah.duff@wits.ac.za. Please use the following format for the subject line of your email: ‘Fass-Sandin Prize Surname First Name’ (eg. Fass-Sandin Prize Aries Philippe). The deadline for nominations is April 17, 2016.

The committee is comprised of:

Sarah Emily Duff (chair), University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg

Daniel Grey, Plymouth University

Leroy Rowe, University of Southern Maine

Feb  04

Call for Nominations: 2016 Fass-Sandin Prize for Best Article in German or Italian

The Society for the History of Children and Youth (SHCY) is pleased to call for nominations for the best article in German or Italian on the history of children, childhood, or youth (broadly construed) published in a 2013, 2014, or 2015 issue of a print or online journal. The SHCY will grant one award. The prize consists of a plaque and a check for $250. The winner will be announced in early September 2016 on the website of the SHCY. She/he will be informed of the award prior to the announcement. Nominations are invited from publishers, editors, scholars, and authors. Eligibility for the awards is based solely on the language in which the article is published, not on the residence or nationality of the author. Current members of the SHCY award committee are ineligible.

CORRECTION (2/8/16): Please note that current officers of the Society, including Executive Committee, ARE ELIGIBLE for nominations.

The deadline for nominations is April 15, 2016.

Please send a PDF or photocopy of the article to both chairs of the prize committee, Patrizia Guarnieri at patrizia.guarnieri@unifi.it and Dirk Schumann at dschuma@uni-goettingen.de. The third member of the committee is Patrizia Dogliani (Bologna).

Committee Members:

Patrizia Guarnieri (chair)
Department Sagas, of History, Archeology, Geography and Fine Arts
University of Florence -Italy

Dirk Schumann (chair)
Seminar für Mittlere und Neuere Geschichte
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Kulturwissenschaftliches Zentrum
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen- Germany

Patrizia Dogliani (member)
Department of History, Culture and Civilization
University of Bologna-Italy

Feb  01

CHC: Season 2, Ep. 2: The History of Sexuality

Childhood: history & critique (CHC) is a multi-media series of interviews, essays, and reports on happenings in the historical study of childhood hosted by a team of scholars and edited by Dr. Patrick J. Ryan. The series is published and circulated online by the Society for the History of Children and Youth.

Audio of Patrick J. Ryan’s Conversation with Kim Phillips and John Spurlock

Commentary by Patrick J. Ryan

John Spurlock and Kim Phillips belong to different communities of scholarship and live on opposite sides of the world. Their paths might never have crossed.

Yet, the briefest sketch of their scholarly efforts reveals important similarities and shared questions. John’s doctoral thesis centered on the mid-19-century “free love movement” and later he joined with Cynthia Magistro to produce a study of 20th-century American woman’s self-writing – New and Improved: the Transformation of American Women’s Emotional Culture (NYU Press, 1998). This past year he published Youth and Sexuality in the Twentieth-Century United States (Routledge, 2015). Kim’s doctoral thesis was published as Medieval Maidens: Young women and gender in England, 1270-1540 (MUP, 2003). She collaborated with Barry Reay to produce Sex before Sexuality: A Premodern History (Polity Press, 2011), and has since written or edited a number of books on the ways women, Asians, and others were positioned in medieval writing.

book cover art

John and Kim study worlds separated by our discipline’s well-policed boundary between modernity and the middle ages, but they share an interest in marriage, sex, youth, and women’s life course. Moreover, when asked about their own intellectual journeys, they respond with familiar words. John wanted to test “the larger narratives of continuity and change,” fashioned through important academic works (Smith-Rosenberg’s “The Female World of Love and Ritual” 1975) and to challenge popular beliefs (e.g. the idea that the sexual revolution began in the 1960s). Likewise, Kim emphasized the larger significance of a history of difference, diversity, and change. When historians examine how cultures form “rules around sexuality (and gender),” and show that these rules are historically contingent, people gain the remit to rethink dominant categories or assumptions. John concurred: covering historical trivia should be secondary to helping students learn to “think historically and (develop) the tools to really follow through…”

I called upon John and Kim precisely because I wanted to talk about foundational ideas within the discipline as they are confronted by those writing the history of youth and sexuality in significantly different periods of time. We began by discussing the reasons for and challenges of pursuing histories of states of being that are widely considered essential features of the human subject – like sexuality. Kim emphasized the importance of trying to read evidence on its own terms. For example, she finds little reason to invoke the concept of “sexual identity” when we read medieval documents. John added that historians would benefit from the way Sex Before Sexuality clearly and convincingly showed that contemporary distinctions, such as the one between heterosexuality and homosexuality, can not be sensibly used to interpret writing prior to modernity. In fact, his research suggests that a careless use of this dualism would cause us to misread middle-class 19th-century Americans. As Phillips and Reay put it, “… one of the great problems with the history of heterosexuality is that we all think we know what it is.” But, what if the very “ordering of desires” is in-and-of-itself historical? (pg. 42)

book cover art

We shared thoughts on the discontinuities in the history of sexuality at length, and delved into differences between modern and medieval source materials. I asked them how they confronted the popular narrative of sexual liberation. Kim responded by concisely explaining why the middle ages can not be adequately cast as an age of repression. She reminds us that cultures and people in the deep past were complicated too. John associated sexual liberation with a “Whig” history of linear progress. His Youth and Sexuality challenges this way of understanding change and the standard assumption that the 1960s was a point of origin or a turning-point for youth sexual liberation. For him, the entire idea that sexual experience and activity is a precondition for being an “integrated” person has become an ontological trap.

It is no coincidence that scholars interested in thinking about change over time, and questioning universal claims about who we have been, are, and might be, would be drawn to historicize things typically considered most essential – sex, love, and the life-course. It seems to me that this propensity applies a number of historical fields that have flowered over the past several decades – including the history of childhood. I hope you enjoy this conversation with John Spurlock and Kim Phillips as much as I did. Take care.

Select Publications by Kim Phillips:
Kim M. Phillips, “Gender and Sexuality” in Routledge History of Medieval Christianity, c.1050-c.1530 edited by R. N. Swanson (London and New York: Routledge, 2015): 309-321. URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/26340

Kim M. Phillips, Before Orientalism: Asian Peoples and Cultures in European Travel Writing, 1245-1510. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014.

Kim M. Phillips, ed. A Cultural History of Women in the Middle Ages. London: Bloomsbury, 2013.

Kim M. Phillips and Barry Reay, Sex Before Sexuality: A Premodern History. Cambridge: Polity, 2011. URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/13493

Kim M. Phillips, Medieval Maidens: Young Women and Gender in England, 1270-1540. Manchester ; New York: Manchester University Press, 2003.

Select Publications by John Spurlock:

John C. Spurlock, Youth and Sexuality in the Twentieth Century United States. New York: Routledge, 2015.

John C. Spurlock, “AIDS.” Encyclopedia of Military Science. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 2012.

John C. Spurlock, “Peyton Place and the boundaries of sexual desire in 1950s U.S.A.” in On the Borders of Convention edited by Aleksandra Nikcevic and Marija Knezevic (Niksic: Faculty of Philosophy, 2010): 183-190.

John C. Spurlock and Cynthia A. Magistro, New and Improved: The Transformation of American Women’s Emotional Culture. New York: New York University Press, 1998.

John C. Spurlock, Free Love: Marriage and Middle-Class Radicalism in America, 1825-1860. New York: New York University Press, 1988.

Kim Phillips

About Kim Phillips

Kim M. Phillips is Associate Professor in the Department of History, University of Auckland, New Zealand. She is interested in the histories of medieval women, gender, sexuality, and representations of foreign lands and peoples in medieval travel and ethnographic writing.

John Spurlock

About John Spurlock

John C. Spurlock is Professor of History, at Seton Hill University in Greensburg, PA where he teaches courses in American history, comparative genocide, global cultures, and geography. He is the author of Youth and Sexuality in the Twentieth-Century United States (Routledge, 2015).

Feb  01

Call for Nominations: 2016 Grace Abbott Book Prize

The Society for the History of Children and Youth (SHCY) is pleased to call for nominations for the best book published in English on the history of children, childhood, or youth (broadly construed) published in 2015.

The award of a plaque and a check for $500 will be made by mid-summer 2016.

Nominations are invited from publishers, editors, scholars, and authors. Current members of the SHCY award committee are ineligible. Nominations must be postmarked by April 15, 2016.

Send a copy of the book, physical or electronic (PDF only), for consideration to each of the book award committee members at the following addresses:

CORRECTION (2/8/16): Please note that current officers of the Society, including Executive Committee, ARE ELIGIBLE for nominations.

Adriana Benzaquén (Chair)
Department of History
Mount Saint Vincent University
166 Bedford Highway
Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3M 2J6
Canada
adriana.benzaquen@msvu.ca

Nara Milanich
Department of History
Barnard College/Columbia University
3009 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
USA
nmilanic@barnard.edu

Hugh Morrison
College of Education
University of Otago
PO Box 56
Dunedin 9054
New Zealand
hugh.morrison@otago.ac.nz

Nov  25

2016 SHCY Outreach Grant Competition

The SHCY will award two $500 grants and one $1500 grant for events that take place in 2016 to projects deemed worthy by the Outreach and Executive Committees of the SHCY.

1. The $500 grants will help defray expenses for speakers, workshops, and other scholarly events fully or partially devoted to the history of children and youth.

Possible uses:
•Keynote speakers or panelists
•Receptions
•Printed materials
•Publicity
•Support for students attending the event

2. The $1500 grant will help offset the costs of a regional conference dedicated to the history of children and youth and held in 2016. The Society is particularly interested in supporting programs that address the the histories of children and youth in interdisciplinary and transnational ways.

Application deadline for both grants: January 15, 2016.

Terms of the grants:
•Applicants must be members of SHCY. (See http://shcyhome.org/membership/ for membership information.)
•Recipients of 2014 and 2015 Outreach Grants cannot receive 2016 grants, and no one may apply for more than one 2016 grant.
•Funds will be distributed directly to host departments or institutions prior to the event.
•SHCY must be acknowledged as co-sponsor on all print and web-based materials and announcements, and, when appropriate, in speaker introductions. When possible, use the SHCY logo and link to the SHCY website.
•SHCY must be sent PDF’s or links to announcements and promotional materials before the event.
•A report must be submitted to the chairs of the Outreach Committee no later than thirty days after the funded event. It should consist of the following:
—Blog post describing the event for use on the SHCY website
—Summary of the attendance (size, makeup)
—Copy of appropriate printed materials or screenshots of websites
—Description of the actual expenses covered by the grant

Note: If the event funded by the grant is part of a larger conference or other function, the funded portion of the conference must be identified as discrete portions of the program and labeled as co-sponsored by SHCY.

One-page applications should be submitted as PDF files via email to the Outreach Committee chair Luke Springman (lspringm@bloomu.edu). They should include:
—Date, location, and primary sponsor of event
—Description of audience (size, makeup)
—Total cost of event and other confirmed or potential funding sources
—Description of event that articulates how it contributes to all or part of SHCY’s mission: promoting the history of children and youth by supporting research about childhood, youth cultures, and the experience of young people across diverse times and places; fostering study across disciplinary and methodological boundaries; providing venues for scholars to communicate with one another; and promoting excellence in scholarship.
–Note: The Committee may request additional information from applicants about their event and about the participants and intended audience.

The Outreach Committee will recommend awardees to the SHCY Executive Committee, which will make final decisions. Recipients of grants will be announced by February 15, 2016.

Nov  18

Child Poverty in Times of Crisis

CFP: Child Poverty in Times of Crisis

University of Salzburg, Austria, 25. & 26. August 2016

Keynote speakers:
Mario Biggeri (Florence) & Lucinda Platt (LSE)

The aim of this conference is threefold: (1) to discuss how different crises (like the recent economic downturn, political instability, natural disasters or (civil) war) affect child poverty; (2) to reveal the consequences such crises have on children living in poverty and their families as well as to show how they respond; and, finally, (3) to provide suggestions for international, national and local policy designs for the reaction to such crises. We are interested in bringing together empirical and theoretical papers and in discussing the normative and ethical issues attached to child poverty and related policy making.

The conference fee is 150 Euros (75 Euros for students) and covers the conference folder, coffee breaks, two lunches, the reception, the conference dinner and a guided city tour.

Please send your proposal (250 words) to cepr@sbg.ac.at until January 31, 2016.

Organised by the Centre for Ethics and Poverty Research at University of Salzburg (CEPR) and the Austrian chapter of Acadamics Stand Against Poverty (ASAP).

For more information please go to:

Conference Homepage: www.uni-salzburg.at/childpoverty2016
ASAP Homepage: http://academicsstand.org/
CEPR Homepage: www.uni-salzburg.at/cepr

Nov  13

Black Women and Girls’ Lives Matter

Hiphop Literacies: Black Women and Girls’ Lives Matter
The Ohio State University
Frank B. Hale Jr. Black Cultural Center, Main Campus
March 30-31, 2016

Call For Papers/Proposals/Performers:

The purpose of the Hiphop Literacies conference is to bring together scholars, educators, activists, students, artists, and community members to dialogue on pressing social problems.  This year our working conference theme is Black Women and Girls’ Lives Matter.  Participants of the Hiphop Literacies Conference join a community of those concerned with African American/Black, Brown and urban literacies, who are interested in challenging the sociopolitical arrangement of the relations between institutions, languages, identities, and power through engagement with local narratives of inequality and lived experience in order to critique a global system of oppression. Literacies scholars who foreground the lives of Hiphop generation youth see Hiphop as providing a framework to ground work in classrooms and communities in democratic ideals.

This movement converges with critical education/literacies and the current BlackLivesMatter modern civil rights movement “created in 2012 after Trayvon Martin’s murderer, George Zimmerman, was acquitted for his crime, and dead 17-year old Trayvon was post-humously placed on trial for his own murder.” (http://blacklivesmatter.com/about/). BlackLivesMatter converges with other efforts to address the legacies of slavery that still oppress Black people in the United States of America: state-sanctioned killing of Black people, state-sanctioned poverty, hatred and oppression of queer people, the prison industrial complex, school-to-prison-pipeline, ineffective schooling and more.  This year’s conference illuminates issues in the struggle to engender the fight for racial justice, so that the needs of girls and women are fully addressed as we continue the fight to dismantle institutional racism and promote healing for collective empowerment of Black and Brown communities. 

Full details available in the downloadable PDF. Abstracts due December 1, 2015.

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