All SHCY members receive the Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth. Published three times a year, it features scholarly research and critical book reviews.

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Oct  06

Call for Applications for Graduate Study Department of Childhood Studies Rutgers University—Camden, NJ, USA

Applications are now being accepted for Ph.D. and MA programs. Ph.D. application deadline: January 12, 2018. Up to 5 years’ funding available, on a competitive basis, in Graduate Assistantships for PhD students. https://childhood.camden.rutgers.edu/graduate-program/faqs/. Please visit the Graduate Admissions website http://gradstudy.rutgers.edu/ for more information.

In addition to Graduate Assistantships, significant ongoing support of graduate student research and travel is also available. Please see https://childhood.camden.rutgers.edu/graduate- program/financial-aid/ for the different funding opportunities offered.

Our graduates have gone on to pursue careers in higher education, counseling, publishing and other areas, nationally and internationally. See “Where Are They Now?” for updates (https://childhood.camden.rutgers.edu/graduate-program/graduate-news/).

Department faculty (http://childhood.camden.rutgers.edu/faculty/) represent diverse areas of scholarship—including psychology, literature, sociology, history, geography, education, media studies, critical race and post-colonial studies and health sciences—who, through research, public engagement and teaching, contribute to the expansion of the dynamic field of childhood studies, with a number having recently published books (https://childhood.camden.rutgers.edu/research/).

Please contact Dr. Sarada Balagopalan (sarada.balagopalan@rutgers.edu), Director of Graduate Studies, with any questions regarding graduate applications.

Announcements: The Department of Childhood Studies is excited to announce that we will be hosting the Anthropology of Childhood and Youth Interest Group (ACYIG) at Rutgers-Camden on March 7-9, 2019. The biennial conference brings together anthropologists and other researchers interested in ethnographic methods and theory to investigate the diverse, lived experiences of children and youth. A Call for Papers will be out in early 2018.

Childhood Studies also recently played host to the Society for the History of Children and Youth Ninth Biennial Conference in June 2017. Approximately 250 attendees from more than dozen countries came to Rutgers-Camden for the memorable three-day event (https://shcy2017.wordpress.com/).

Background: The Department of Childhood Studies at Rutgers University in Camden, New Jersey USA (http://childhood.camden.rutgers.edu/), opened its doors in September 2007 as the first Ph.D. granting program in Childhood Studies in North America. Graduate students in the program (http://childhood.camden.rutgers.edu/graduate-program/graduate-students/), hail from a variety of backgrounds and bring with them an impressive array of educational and life experience.

Childhood Studies_Rutgers-Camden_Grad Applications 2018

Oct  04

CFP: Global Studies of Childhood

CFP: Global Studies of Childhood
Special Issue: Children and Popular Culture
Guest Editor: Patrick Cox, Rutgers University

Childhood and youth are always contested notions, but perhaps nowhere more than in popular culture. Popular culture offers representations of children and youth as, among other things, wise, dangerous, evil, innocent, sexual, doomed, and in various states of “in progress.” Popular culture is also the broad site of much child agency, where children and youth produce texts from novels to YouTube channels to websites, blogs, and zines, frequently outstripping their adult contemporaries in technological savvy and communicative capability. Popular culture for children is by turns condescending to the youngest audience, crass, pedantic, and appropriated by adults for their own pleasure. Elements of popular culture are designed to educate and socialize children; others are manipulated by children as political activism. These turns call into question and trouble conceptions not only of “the child” but of “popular culture” itself and propose a compelling nexus of questions befitting both Childhood Studies and Popular Culture Studies.

In this special issue, authors are invited to consider intersections of popular culture by, for, and about childhood, both broadly construed. We will explore both the impacts of popular culture on youth and childhood and the very real impacts of children and youth on popular culture. All disciplinary approaches are welcome, including but not limited to textual and visual analysis, ethnographic work, studies of children’s popular material culture, historical readings, comparative analysis of texts, and consumer and communication studies.

Additionally, contemplations of the interstices between Childhood Studies and Popular Culture Studies as academic endeavors are encouraged. The two fields have been in limited conversation with one another, perhaps separated by epistemological and methodological concerns, yet the available data seems like a rich vein for insight. While both fields are multi-disciplinary and continuously evolving, Childhood Studies maintains very clear traces of its roots in social sciences, while Popular Culture Studies is still found more often housed in the Humanities. The two fields each have at their center subjects that have at times made it difficult for them to be taken seriously as sites of academic inquiry. With different questions at their core, how can the two fields interact? Put another way, how do we study this multitude of texts?

[u]Topics for this special issue might include:[/u]
Popular culture and education, whether intentional or inadvertent;
Children’s popular culture as grown-up nostalgia;
Youth vs. adult perspectives on popular culture;
Children and youth as producers of popular culture;
New media as empowering or oppressive;
Capabilities for communication and interconnectivity;
Adult consumption of children’s popular culture;
Children’s consumption of decades-old popular culture;
Definitions of youth in popular culture;
Nostalgia through revivals and reboots;
Social media;
Diminishing space between children’s and adult popular culture.

The guest editor welcomes submissions of articles via the journal submission system on its SAGE Publishing site. See “Submission Guidelines” here: https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/global-studies-childhood#description.

Deadline for submissions: December 1, 2017.

Please send any queries to guest editor Patrick Cox at patrick.cox@rutgers.edu.

Oct  04

2017 Fass-Sandin Prize for the Best Article on the History of Childhood and Youth (Spanish and French)

The committee for the 2017 Fass-Sandin Prize for the Best Article on the History of Childhood and Youth written in French and/or Spanish and published between 2015 and 2017 has received eight high-quality articles, and selected the following two to receive the Prize and an Honorable Mention:

Prize Winner:

Fábio Macedo, “ACTION HUMANITAIRE ET ADOPTION D’ENFANTS ÉTRANGERS EN SUISSE. LE CAS DE TERRE DES HOMMES (1960-1969)”, Relations internationales 2015/2 (n° 161), p. 81-94.

The article represents an innovative, thoroughly researched, and original approach to the study of both humanitarian action and child adoption over an understudied decade. It builds upon a wide array of primary sources, and pays close attention to the interconnections of State-led and civil initiatives, including their tensions and negotiations. The article contributes to ongoing historiographical debates surrounding child mobility, adoption, and the effects of international wars (in this case, the Algerian War and the Vietnam War). It also adds to a better understanding of the making of new legislation, especially by combining the perspectives of discourse analysis and political history. It will surely become a major reference for those scholars interested in childhood history from a transnational perspective.

Honorable Mention:

Elena Jackson Albarrán, “Los niños colaboradores de la revista Pulgarcito y la construcción de la infancia, México 1925-1932”, Iberoamericana, XV, no. 60, 2015, pp. 155-168.

The article represents an original, finely argued and written, piece of research that sheds light on both State initiatives and child agency. By focusing on the children’s magazine Pulgarcito, depending on the Mexican Public Education Secretariat, the article reconstructs the history of how the authorities understood the role of child’s drawings in connection with ideas of civility and modern nationhood. Equally important, the article approaches to children’s drawings in their own terms, in an effort to elucidate the meanings that children created out such concepts as cleanliness, education, and the nation.

Prize Committee
Dr. Célia Keren, History, Sciences Po Toulouse – LaSSP
Dr. Valeria Manzano (Chair), History, Universidad de San Martín/CONICET
Dr. Amélie Nuq, History, LARHRA – Institut des Sciences de l’Homme. UFR Sciences humaines

Aug  31

“The Century of the Childhood” Webinar by Jim Marten at the National Humanities Center

Jim Marten will lead a webinar for the National Humanities Center on “The Century of the Childhood.”

Date: October 24, 2017

See more at http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/webinars/

Aug  30

Grace Abbott Book Prize 2016

The Society for the History of Children and Youth is pleased to announce that 2016 Grace Abbott Book Prize has been awarded to David Pomfret’s Youth and Empire: Trans-Colonial Childhoods in British and French Asia (Stanford UP).

The prize committee of Anna Mae Duane, Helle Strandgaard Jensen, and Sabine Fruhstuck wrote:

Youth and Empire is remarkable for its ambitious, innovative approach to youth and childhood. Its transnational scope and deft theorizing of how childhood functions (both symbolically and materially) in colonial enterprises offers rich food for thought for scholars working across the field. This study stepped into the role of what the Grace Abbott Prize winner should do: offer new and exciting directions for the field to pursue.”

Sincerely,

P. Ryan
SHCY President

Aug  30

JHCY Best Article Prize for 2016

From James Marten, JHCY, editor

The JHCY Best Article Prize selection committee (MJ Maynes, Rebecca Friedman, and Birgitte Soland) has selected the winner and one honorable mention for Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth Best Article Prize for 2016. The winner receives a certificate and $250.

Winner:
Sarah Walters: “’Child! Now You Are’: Identity Registration, Labor, and the Definition of Childhood in Colonial Tanganyika, 1910-1950”

Sarah Walters’ exceptionally well written article manages the trick of being both conceptually sophisticated and absolutely accessible to non-specialist audiences. Her article traces child labor in colonial Tanganyika over the first half of the 20th century and argues that the variations in and ambiguity of definitions of childhood had many repercussions, including the institutional inability to implement child labor legislation. At the same time, Walters explains, this lack of a singular definition of childhood meant that children could exert themselves and claim agency over their own economic futures by working and increasing their financial security. This complex view of colonial processes is one of the most impressive aspects of this multifaceted research piece. By using evidence from the archives including inspection reports, legislative debates, newspapers, and anthropological investigations, Walters aptly challenges the notion that western definitions of childhood were imposed on colonial subjects wholesale; rather what we find is the degree to which children and youth in colonial Tanganyika were able to act as somewhat autonomous agents, using western-oriented definitions and rules to their own advantage. In addition to its historical originality, this scholarship will be useful and stimulating to any reader intrigued with wider present-day discussions about empowerment, agency, and the politics of development and also about human rights – including children’s rights.

Honorable Mention:
Susan Miller: “Assent as Agency in the Early Years of the Children of the American Revolution”

This excellent article on children’s participation in the group Children of the American Revolution, which was affiliated with the Daughters of the American Revolution, does a marvelous job of offering complex and creative ways of approaching the question of agency in childhood studies. In particular, Miller complicates dichotomous understandings of agency by suggesting that there is a “continuum from opposition to assent” when it comes to children asserting themselves, rather that imagining agency as a simple matter of having it or not having it.

Jul  12

SHCY needs your feedback!

The Society for the History of Children and Youth (SHCY) invites you to participate in a survey designed to inform our efforts to advance the production and dissemination of historical research on childhood and youth.

This questionnaire is written for any researcher or professional engaged in historical work on childhood and youth across disciplines, topics, regions, periods (etc.). We hope to better understand your backgrounds, interests, and preferences regardless of whether you are a SHCY member or have previously attended our events.

The survey can be completed with any hand-held device or computer with an internet connection. It takes about 10 minutes – depending on how much you wish to write. Link to it at: https://uwo.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_cwMWJSdqqFyFqoB

A small amount of your time will help us do better than guessing after or projecting our own limited experiences upon what we know is a very diverse group of people.

Jun  29

Call for Papers: History of Education Society 50th Anniversary Conference

Theme: Celebration, Commemoration and Collaboration
When: November 10-November 12, 2017
Where: Winchester, United Kingdom

Registration is now open! Details can be found on this registration form

In 2017 as the History of Education Society (UK) celebrates 50 years of scholarship and international collaboration, we look forward to welcoming colleagues, friends, and those new to the field, to historic Winchester. It is time for celebration to recognise the distance travelled in the development of ideas, theories and practice in the history of education. It is also a time for looking forward to what the next fifty years may hold. Proposals are welcome for formal papers, workshops, symposia and posters on the themes of celebration, commemoration and collaboration.

We encourage authors to think creatively within the themes and to identify new directions. Proposals may include spatial, material and sensory methodologies, international, transnational, imperial and colonial perspectives using a range of sources, interpretations and theoretical approaches.

Postgraduate students are welcome to submit full proposals on conference themes. In addition, there will be a dedicated session for students to present 10 minute work in progress papers on their current research. A limited number of bursaries will be available, more details to follow.

Proposals should address aspects of commemoration, celebration and/or collaboration in the following:

  • Education as public history
  • Mapping the field
  • Institutional histories
  • Personal and political histories of education
  • Formal and informal education
  • Archives and objects

Abstracts of 250 words should be sent to the Centre for the History of Women’s Education at the University of Winchester: CHWE@winchester.ac.uk

The first call for papers closes March 31st, while the second call for papers closes July 31st. Please state which strand(s) your paper addresses.

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