CFP: Journal of Childhood and Religion

The Journal of Childhood and Religion, a peer-reviewed on-line publication of Sopher Press, provides an interdisciplinary forum for scholars representing a wide range of research fields, interests, and perspectives that relate to children and religion. Such fields may include but are not limited to religious studies, biblical studies, the range of human sciences, pastoral psychology, practical theology, pastoral theology, religious education, psychology of religion, sociology of religion, counseling psychology, social work, and cultural studies.

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Religious “Others,” Schooling, and the Negotiation of Civic Identities

Call for Participation, Interdisciplinary Symposium
June 25-28, 2014
Hannover, Germany

Abstract
The symposium will explore the relationship between hegemonic discourses of citizenship, religio-cultural belonging, and the negotiation of civic identities among religio-cultural minority youths in educational settings. The question of how non-dominant youths negotiate their civic identities as citizens in light of their coexisting religio-cultural identities has been at the center of a heated debate in many modern societies. The ongoing public concern about the resurgence of the religious – and here especially the religious ‘other’ – in the public sphere has led to the emergence of a public debate over how to handle the ‘religious’ in the institutions, civic society, and public sphere of ‘postsecular’ society. The symposium will explore how societal master narratives about secularity, religion/ the religious ‘other,’ and citizenship are instantiated in the everyday practices of schools and classrooms, and how students from religious minority groups in turn come to navigate their identities as citizens.

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CFAuthors: Social History of American Families

The statistics tell the story of the American family: According to the
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 marked the milestone when blended families or
stepfamilies became the most common form of family in America; 2,100
new blended families are formed every day in this country; 41 percent
of unmarried couples living together have children living in the home;
over 65 percent of Americans are now a stepparent, a stepchild, a
stepsibling, a step-grandparent, or touched directly by a stepfamily
scenario. Moreover, the Pew Research Center reports interracial
marriages are on the rise in America—in 1980, 3 percent of married
couples were mixed race; today 1 in 12 couples are interracial
couples.

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