Child Poverty in Times of Crisis

CFP: Child Poverty in Times of Crisis

University of Salzburg, Austria, 25. & 26. August 2016

Keynote speakers:
Mario Biggeri (Florence) & Lucinda Platt (LSE)

The aim of this conference is threefold: (1) to discuss how different crises (like the recent economic downturn, political instability, natural disasters or (civil) war) affect child poverty; (2) to reveal the consequences such crises have on children living in poverty and their families as well as to show how they respond; and, finally, (3) to provide suggestions for international, national and local policy designs for the reaction to such crises. We are interested in bringing together empirical and theoretical papers and in discussing the normative and ethical issues attached to child poverty and related policy making.

The conference fee is 150 Euros (75 Euros for students) and covers the conference folder, coffee breaks, two lunches, the reception, the conference dinner and a guided city tour.

Please send your proposal (250 words) to cepr@sbg.ac.at until January 31, 2016.

Organised by the Centre for Ethics and Poverty Research at University of Salzburg (CEPR) and the Austrian chapter of Acadamics Stand Against Poverty (ASAP).

For more information please go to:

Conference Homepage: www.uni-salzburg.at/childpoverty2016
ASAP Homepage: http://academicsstand.org/
CEPR Homepage: www.uni-salzburg.at/cepr

Indigenous Children’s Rights

Canadian Journal of Children’s Rights
Call for Manuscripts, Special Issue: Indigenous Children’s Rights

A special issue of the Canadian Journal of Children’s Rights dedicated to exploring rights in the lives of Indigenous children is open for submissions. For this special issue we invite a range of contributions including scholarly essays, original research articles, comparative analyses, critical reviews, advocacy and policy articles as well as personal narratives, interviews, oral histories, and poetry. We are interested in presenting a wide range of perspectives relating to Indigenous children and rights.

For more information, download the full CFP (PDF)..

2nd Childhood Studies Colloquium

The 2nd Childhood Studies Colloquium will be held in Dunedin on 20th and 21st October 2015 on the theme: What does Childhood Studies mean for research, policy and practice?

Children and young people deal with a vast range of widening inequalities in their social and physical environments. Researchers from many disciplines, practitioners, policy makers and activists often work individually to improve the life of our young citizens. While children and young people’s economic, social, cultural and physical wellbeing lie at the heart of such efforts, debates continue about what working under the umbrella term of “Childhood Studies” actually means theoretically and practically to address the pressing issues facing children and young people in the 21st century.

This colloquium will provide an opportunity reflect on how we conceptualise and put childhood studies into diverse practices. Critical reflections on, and discussions about, the ways forward to improve and contribute to all aspects of children and young people’s wellbeing here in Aotearoa and across the globe lie at the heart of the colloquium.

This interdisciplinary colloquium will be of relevance and interest to a wide range of participants including academics, researchers, students, advocates, policy makers and practitioners.

The colloquium follows on from the very successful 1st Childhood Studies Colloquium held in Auckland in November last year. The 2015 Colloquium is being co-hosted by the University of Otago Children and Young People as Social Actors Research Cluster, the Children’s Issues Centre and the organisers of the 1st Colloquium. We are grateful to the University of Otago Humanities Divison for their generous financial support for this event. The 20th anniversary of the Children’s Issues Centre will also be celebrated at the Colloquium.

Our three keynote speakers will be making the following presentations:

· Professor Nigel Thomas, Professor of Childhood and Youth Research, School of Social Work, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, England: Recognition, capability and children’s participation in society: A new move in childhood studies?
· Associate Professor Affrica Taylor, Geographies of Education and Childhood, University of Canberra, Australia: What does the more-than-human turn mean for childhood studies research?
· Alison Cleland, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of Auckland; Chair, Action for Children and Youth Aotearoa: Social justice for Aotearoa’s children: A child rights framework.

Abstracts are due by 3 July to 2015csc@otago.ac.nz. Any inquiries should be directed to the Children’s Issues Centre – Ph: (03) 479 5038. Email: 2015csc@otago.ac.nz.

Children and Childhood Network of SSHA: CFPapers or Session Proposals

We invite you to participate in the 39th annual meeting of the Social Science History Association by submitting a paper or session proposal to the Children and Childhood Network of the SSHA. The conference will take place November 6-9, 2014 in Toronto. For more information on the conference as well as the general call for proposals, please refer to the SSHA website: http://www.ssha.org. The deadline for full panel or individual paper proposals is February 14, 2014.

The association particularly emphasizes interdisciplinary and transnational research, and the annual meeting provides a very supportive environment in which to present new work. The theme of the 2014 conference is “Inequalities: Politics, Policy and the Past,” though papers on other aspects of the history of children and childhood are also welcome. Complete panels must include at least 4 papers and presenters from more than one academic institution. Other formats, including roundtable discussions and book sessions, are also possible. Please do get in touch with the network chairs if you have an idea for a session but need help gathering presenters. Among the topics we are especially interested in exploring are children as migrants; children and revolutions; indigenous children & youth, child labor and globalization; gendered experiences of childhood; and inequalities in children’s literature.

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CFAuthors: Social History of American Families

The statistics tell the story of the American family: According to the
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 marked the milestone when blended families or
stepfamilies became the most common form of family in America; 2,100
new blended families are formed every day in this country; 41 percent
of unmarried couples living together have children living in the home;
over 65 percent of Americans are now a stepparent, a stepchild, a
stepsibling, a step-grandparent, or touched directly by a stepfamily
scenario. Moreover, the Pew Research Center reports interracial
marriages are on the rise in America—in 1980, 3 percent of married
couples were mixed race; today 1 in 12 couples are interracial
couples.

Continue reading “CFAuthors: Social History of American Families”