CFP: Children’s Rights and Children’s Literature

CHILDREN’S RIGHTS and CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
Special Issue of The Lion and the Unicorn

Guest Editors:
Lara Saguisag, College of Staten Island-City University of New York and Matthew B. Prickett, Rutgers University-Camden

We are seeking papers that investigate the intersections between the histories, theories, and practices of children’s rights and children’s literature. In response to the ratification of the United Nation’s Convention on the Rights of the Child (UN-CRC) in 1989, advocates and scholars have debated the necessity and revealed the complexity of defining and implementing children’s rights across the globe. Critical discourse on children’s rights, however, has not yet fully examined the role that children’s literature plays in shaping, promoting, implementing and interrogating children’s rights. This special issue invites scholars to explore the connections between the institutions of children’s rights and children’s literature.

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American Identities in Literature and Culture

American Identities in Literature and Culture
First Annual Graham Letters and Culture Symposium
Saturday, 5 April 2014 at Blackburn College in Carlinville, Illinois

We invite individual proposals for papers from Blackburn College students and alumni—as well as graduate students, independent scholars, and academics from across the country and around the world—for the Graham Letters and Culture Symposium celebrating Roy Graham’s fifty years of service to Blackburn College. We welcome proposals across a wide spectrum of time or geography or topic; this year’s theme is the creating and contesting of American identities in film, print, and sound.

Individuals who wish to contribute to the symposium should submit 250-word proposals and a one-page CV to Dr. Ren Draya (ren.draya@blackburn.edu, Professor of English & Communications, Blackburn College) and Dr. Ian Aebel (ian.aebel@tamuk.edu; Assistant Professor of History, Texas A&M University-Kingsville) by Friday, 13 December 2013. Presentations should be planned for twenty minutes. All prospective speakers will be notified of a decision by Wednesday, 22 January 2014.

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Children’s Literature, Childhood Death, and the Emotions 1500-1800

CFP: 2 day symposium on Children’s Literature, Childhood Death, and the Emotions, 1500-1800 at University of Western Australia

Although historians from many disciplines have begun the work of documenting the histories of childhood and childhood culture, very little is known about the ways in which emotions relating to childhood were represented to children through the literature and accompanying images created for, about and, occasionally, by them. Currently the majority of work on children’s literature sits outside cognate historical studies. This symposium, co-hosted with the Children’s Literature Unit of Newcastle University, UK, will bring together scholars from a range of disciplines to build links with children’s literature studies through an examination of material relating to the death of children. It aims to develop understanding of how children were taught about, experienced and taught to manage the powerful emotions associated with the death of children — siblings, friends, characters in texts or their own impending death — and how attitudes and responses to a range of emotions changed across time and place. In addition to materials specifically for children, sources of interest include diaries, journals, correspondence, teaching materials, medical treatises, drawings, samplers, ballads, legal papers, instructions for rituals and any other kinds of documents and materials that provide insights into children’s emotional reactions to childhood death and the emotions children’s deaths provoked in others. The symposium will demonstrate the value of putting information about children alongside texts for children.

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CFP: Early African American Children’s Literature

Early African American Children’s Literature: An anthology of original essays

African American childhood in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries was a fraught proposition. On one hand, African Americans of all ages were infantilized by those in power. On the other hand, evolving constructions of childhood explicitly excluded African Americans: they were not cherubs dependent on motherly love, and they weren’t part of a private domestic sphere, and, the argument ran, they were never going to grow into self-sufficient adulthood. Perhaps it’s no surprise that we have not really thought about African American children’s literature in the years before 1900. Yet as scholars such as Caroline Lavender, Karen Sanchez-Eppler, Courtney Wiekle-Mills, Robin Bernstein and others have shown, literature about childhood and aimed at children were rich sites for conveying—and rejecting—vital concepts of personal and national development that would translate into ideologies of race, class, gender, sexuality and citizenship.

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Girls and Girlhood in Adaptations of Shakespeare

Call for Papers: Girls and Girlhood in Adaptations of Shakespeare
Special Issue of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation

The editors of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation, in conjunction with guest editor Deanne Williams, York University, extend a call for papers for B&L 9.2 (Fall 2014) on the topic of Girls and Girlhood in Adaptations of Shakespeare.

In 2012, the United Nations celebrated the first “Day of the Girl Child,” highlighting the treatment of girls and young women as the key moral issue of our time. As the advancement of girls becomes a global economic, medical, and social priority, literary scholars are turning their attention to cultural representations of and by girls and to historical and philosophical conceptions of girlhood. This special issue of Borrowers and Lenders initiates a scholarly conversation on girls and girlhood in adaptations of Shakespeare, seeking papers that address the process of adapting Shakespeare for girl actors, readers, patrons or audiences; adaptations of Shakespeare’s “girl” characters; and girls’ responses to and appropriations of Shakespeare. We encourage contributions that range from Shakespeare’s contemporaries and Restoration theatre to contemporary authors, playwrights, visual artists and directors, as well those that engage with newer or non-canonical literary genres such as online and Web 2.0 Shakespeares; fanfiction and the graphic novel; autobiography, memoirs and life writing; Shakespeare for children; and international, multicultural and postcolonial adaptations.

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The Child in the World

The Child in the World will be a one day conference on 9 November 2013 held at the V&A Museum of Childhood in London. Dr Karen Wells will be the keynote speaker.

The deadline for paper submissions has been extended to 13 March 2013.

• How have children’s lives been shaped by global processes and events, both past and present?
• How do children understand their place within the world and how has this sense of place changed or remained the same?
• How have children’s lives been shaped by experiences of global travel, of migration and displacement?

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Young People’s Materials and Culture

Call for Papers: Journal of Graduate Research in Young People’s Materials and Culture (JGR)

Based at the University of British Columbia the Journal of Graduate Research in Young People’s Materials and Culture (JGR) is a peer-reviewed open-access e-journal publishing graduate student research in the areas of children’s and young adult literature, childhood studies, and cultural studies related to children and young people.
We are currently selecting manuscripts for our winter 2013 issue. Papers on any children’s or young adult genres are welcome as are papers that discuss other children’s materials such as film, virtual texts, or graphic novels.

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