CFP: Youth Circulations

Youth Circulations (www.youthcirculations.com) is an online exhibit that traces the real and imagined circulations of global youth. As a collection of photographic representations, Youth Circulations illuminates a critical disconnect between the nuanced, transnational lives of the young migrants and the active reduction of these lives into abbreviated tropes–the vulnerable victim<http://www.youthcirculations.com/#/victimized/>, the delinquent<http://www.youthcirculations.com/#/delinquent/>, and so on–in mainstream news sources and policy reports.

Youth Circulations invites scholars and artists to submit work that considers these primary circulations:

  1. Youth themselves circulate. Through transnational movement and global technologies, young people circulate between nations, communities, and virtual spaces.
  2. Global youth are agents of circulation. As transnational actors, young migrants shape and contribute to global flows of people, capital, ideas, and values.
  3. Ideas circulate about global youth. Put forth in the media, in policy reports, and by advocacy and opposition efforts, representations of young migrants are power-filled and consequential, both in and beyond communities of origin and destination.

Submission format and length is flexible. We invite proposals for an individual blog post or photo essay; a brief analysis of a photo, series of photos, or a gallery on the site; a written or photographic  “conversation” between two or more individuals; or any other work that considers, critiques, or creatively counters so many circulating images of global youth.

With a wide, interdisciplinary readership, Youth Circulations offers artists, scholars, and practitioners a dynamic space to present and interact with ideas about age, mobility, and representation. To contribute, please email youthcirculations@gmail.com.

Unheard Learners: Children and Youth Experiences in Neoliberal Schools

Call for Manuscripts

The Journal of Critical Education Policy Studies 
Special Issue: December 2015

Guest Editors: Debbie Sonu, Hunter College, City University of New York and Julie Gorlewski, State University of New York at New Paltz.

Chief and Managing Editor: Professor Dave Hill, Research Professor of Education at Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, England

The Journal of Critical Education Policy Studies (JCEPS) and guest editors Debbie Sonu and Julie Gorlewski are seeking manuscripts for a special issue that is scheduled for publication in December 2015.

This special issue, entitled “Unheard Learners: Children and Youth Experiences in Neoliberal Schools,” aims to feature the work of established and emerging scholars from a variety of disciplines who explore school reform and schooling experiences from the standpoint of children and youth in public and private K-12 institutions from any socio-economic, cultural, or geographic location within the United States.

We invite research articles that draw from empirical work, as well as conceptual or theoretical papers that use in some form the direct perspectives of children and youth as learners in the current context of neoliberal school cultures, including but not limited to issues of testing, discipline, relationships, authority, states of being, curriculum, and pedagogy. Contributors may take up a wide range of theoretical frameworks, including feminist, Marxist, postcolonial, poststructural, psychoanalytic, critical, and historical lenses to present divergent perspectives that link children and youth with the urgent and immediate changes that are impacting schools today.

Full manuscripts of 6000-8000 words are expected for submission.

Timeline:

Submission Deadline: October 1, 2015
Notification by: October 15
Reviews returned by: October 15
Final Revisions due: November 1
Publication date: December 7

All submissions must strictly adhere to JCEPS style guidelines:www.jceps.com/submissions. Manuscripts must have a title, name of author(s), university/institutional affiliation including city, state (if USA), country, abstract (150 words), key words (5-7), main document, references, and at the end of the manuscript, author/writer details, and correspondence information.

All inquiries can be made to either dsonu@hunter.cuny.edu orgorlewsj@newpaltz.edu.

2nd Childhood Studies Colloquium

The 2nd Childhood Studies Colloquium will be held in Dunedin on 20th and 21st October 2015 on the theme: What does Childhood Studies mean for research, policy and practice?

Children and young people deal with a vast range of widening inequalities in their social and physical environments. Researchers from many disciplines, practitioners, policy makers and activists often work individually to improve the life of our young citizens. While children and young people’s economic, social, cultural and physical wellbeing lie at the heart of such efforts, debates continue about what working under the umbrella term of “Childhood Studies” actually means theoretically and practically to address the pressing issues facing children and young people in the 21st century.

This colloquium will provide an opportunity reflect on how we conceptualise and put childhood studies into diverse practices. Critical reflections on, and discussions about, the ways forward to improve and contribute to all aspects of children and young people’s wellbeing here in Aotearoa and across the globe lie at the heart of the colloquium.

This interdisciplinary colloquium will be of relevance and interest to a wide range of participants including academics, researchers, students, advocates, policy makers and practitioners.

The colloquium follows on from the very successful 1st Childhood Studies Colloquium held in Auckland in November last year. The 2015 Colloquium is being co-hosted by the University of Otago Children and Young People as Social Actors Research Cluster, the Children’s Issues Centre and the organisers of the 1st Colloquium. We are grateful to the University of Otago Humanities Divison for their generous financial support for this event. The 20th anniversary of the Children’s Issues Centre will also be celebrated at the Colloquium.

Our three keynote speakers will be making the following presentations:

· Professor Nigel Thomas, Professor of Childhood and Youth Research, School of Social Work, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, England: Recognition, capability and children’s participation in society: A new move in childhood studies?
· Associate Professor Affrica Taylor, Geographies of Education and Childhood, University of Canberra, Australia: What does the more-than-human turn mean for childhood studies research?
· Alison Cleland, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of Auckland; Chair, Action for Children and Youth Aotearoa: Social justice for Aotearoa’s children: A child rights framework.

Abstracts are due by 3 July to 2015csc@otago.ac.nz. Any inquiries should be directed to the Children’s Issues Centre – Ph: (03) 479 5038. Email: 2015csc@otago.ac.nz.

Journal of Popular Music Studies Special Issue on Girls and Popular Music

Guest editors: Sarah Dougher and Diane Pecknold
7,000-word articles due September 1, 2015

The Journal of Popular Music Studies invites submissions for a special issue on Girls and Popular Music. Beginning with the publication of Angela McRobbie’s work on the bedroom music culture of British girls, popular music has been a core aspect of the emergent field of girls’ studies. Conversely, attention to the musical practices of girls and to constructions of girlhood and female youth have revised our understandings of the ways popular music as a whole is produced and consumed. Kyra Gaunt’s discussion of the ways girls’ rhyming and chanting games reflect and reshape the same principles of black music-making as commercial hip-hop; Norma Coates’s suggestion that teenyboppers and groupies provided the foundational low Others against which rock culture secured its own credibility; and Gayle Wald’s interrogation of girlishness as a performative resource through which adult women’s position in popular music is established are only a few examples of critical role real and figurative girls play in shaping popular music and scholarly approaches to it.

In recent years, however, the relationship between girlhood and popular music has undergone significant shifts. The rapidly changing sphere of media and media access is often characterized as a threat to girls, both in terms of morality and productivity, but at the same time it offers them newly visible roles in the music economy as child stars, amateur musicians, and YouTube personalities. New technologies such as mobile recording, social media, YouTube, and blogging as well as new institutional structures, such as digital music distribution, the formalized tween music industry, and the rise of girl-serving organizations based on musicking call for a re-examination of the ways girlhood and female youth are constructed and experienced through popular music.
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CFP: Playthings in Early Modernity

Contributions are sought for an interdisciplinary collection of essays to be edited by Allison Levy and published by Ashgate Publishing Co. in the new book series, Cultures of Play, 1300-1700 (see http://www.ashgate.com/default.aspx?page=5166; series editor Bret Rothstein). Dedicated to early modern playfulness, this series serves two purposes. First, it recounts the history of wit, humor, and games, from jokes and sermons, for instance, to backgammon and blind man’s buff. Second, in addressing its topic – ludic culture – broadly, Cultures of Play also provides a forum for reconceptualizing the play elements of early modern economic, political, religious, and social life.

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Fun with Dick and Jane: Gender and Childhood

“Fun with Dick and Jane: Gender and Childhood”: A Gender Studies Conference at the University of Notre Dame
South Bend, Indiana
December 4-6, 2014

In recent years, there has been great interest in questions of gender and childhood, ranging from issues around boys wearing princess costumes to school; to Disney princess culture; to parents refusing to announce a baby’s biological sex; to pre-teen children coming out as gay, lesbian, and queer; to toy companies marketing toys by gender; to gender-related bullying, and more.

How are children gendered? How do we account for transgender children? How have ideas about girls and boys changed historically? How are children hailed as gendered consumers? How do schools inculcate ideas about gender? How do children’s books promote ideas about gender? How do changing ideas about parenting relate to children’s gendering?

This conference seeks to explore issues of gender and childhood through multiple lenses and from a wide range of disciplines. We welcome papers on gender and childhood in media, literature, history, anthropology, biology, architecture, philosophy, art history, sociology, education, and more. We are especially open to interdisciplinary approaches.

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Theorizing Childhood: Citizenship, Rights, Participation

Call for Papers
Sociology of Childhood – Theorizing Childhood: Citizenship, Rights, Participation

The Research Network, Sociology of Children and Childhood hereby announces the mid-term symposium which will take place in Modena (Italy) from 21st to 23rd May, 2014. The organisation of the symposium will be undertaken at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia.

The focus of the symposium will be on theorizing childhood, in particular the areas of citizenship, rights and participation, exploring the different and various perspectives that can include these topics in the broader field of childhood studies and Sociology.

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Cute Studies

Call for Papers: “Cute Studies,” a special issue of the East Asian Journal of Popular Culture

Cuteness has a global reach: it is an affective response; an aesthetic category; a performative act of self-expression; and an immensely popular form of consumption. This themed issue of the East Asian Journal of Popular Culture is intended to launch the new, interdisciplinary, transnational academic field of Cute Studies.

Cute culture, a nineteenth century development in Europe and the US, with an earlier expression in Edo-era Japan, has flourished in East Asia since the 1970s, and around the world from the turn of the new millennium. This special issue seeks papers that engage with a wide variety of both the forms that express cute culture, and the platforms upon which its articulation depends. Thus, the field of Cute Studies casts a wide net, analyzing not only consumers of cute commodities, but also those who seek to enact, represent, or reference cuteness through personal presentation or behavior. Since these groups intermingle, cute culture may be seen as a type of fan community, in which the line between consumers and producers is continually renegotiated. Cute Studies also encompasses critical analyses of the creative works produced by practitioners such as artists, designers, and performers, as well as the circumstances that determine the production and dissemination of these works.

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Religious “Others,” Schooling, and the Negotiation of Civic Identities

Call for Participation, Interdisciplinary Symposium
June 25-28, 2014
Hannover, Germany

Abstract
The symposium will explore the relationship between hegemonic discourses of citizenship, religio-cultural belonging, and the negotiation of civic identities among religio-cultural minority youths in educational settings. The question of how non-dominant youths negotiate their civic identities as citizens in light of their coexisting religio-cultural identities has been at the center of a heated debate in many modern societies. The ongoing public concern about the resurgence of the religious – and here especially the religious ‘other’ – in the public sphere has led to the emergence of a public debate over how to handle the ‘religious’ in the institutions, civic society, and public sphere of ‘postsecular’ society. The symposium will explore how societal master narratives about secularity, religion/ the religious ‘other,’ and citizenship are instantiated in the everyday practices of schools and classrooms, and how students from religious minority groups in turn come to navigate their identities as citizens.

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Depictions of Bullying in Popular Culture

Bullying has been a hot topic in recent years in terms of education, social media, and garnering awareness and protection of all persons from bullying. While being bullied or picked on used to be considered something of a rite of passage of elementary and high school, it is now considered a serious offense and can result in school expulsion and criminal charges. The scope of bullying within popular culture has also changed radically; depicting scenes in television or movies regarding bullying is now considered offensive and come with a warning at the start of an episode.

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Girls and Girlhood in Adaptations of Shakespeare

Call for Papers: Girls and Girlhood in Adaptations of Shakespeare
Special Issue of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation

The editors of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation, in conjunction with guest editor Deanne Williams, York University, extend a call for papers for B&L 9.2 (Fall 2014) on the topic of Girls and Girlhood in Adaptations of Shakespeare.

In 2012, the United Nations celebrated the first “Day of the Girl Child,” highlighting the treatment of girls and young women as the key moral issue of our time. As the advancement of girls becomes a global economic, medical, and social priority, literary scholars are turning their attention to cultural representations of and by girls and to historical and philosophical conceptions of girlhood. This special issue of Borrowers and Lenders initiates a scholarly conversation on girls and girlhood in adaptations of Shakespeare, seeking papers that address the process of adapting Shakespeare for girl actors, readers, patrons or audiences; adaptations of Shakespeare’s “girl” characters; and girls’ responses to and appropriations of Shakespeare. We encourage contributions that range from Shakespeare’s contemporaries and Restoration theatre to contemporary authors, playwrights, visual artists and directors, as well those that engage with newer or non-canonical literary genres such as online and Web 2.0 Shakespeares; fanfiction and the graphic novel; autobiography, memoirs and life writing; Shakespeare for children; and international, multicultural and postcolonial adaptations.

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Symposium on Infancy, Adolescence, and Youth

Call for Papers: Symposium on Infancy, Adolescence, and Youth, Universidad Sergio Arbolleda, Bogota, Columbia, May 2-4, 2013. Proposals due January 31, 2013.

Convocatoria (español) para presentación de propuesta de ponencias al Simposio INFANCIA, ADOLESCENCIA Y JUVENTUD, MIRADAS INTERDISCIPLINARIAS que será desarrollado junto al II ENCUENTRO DE LAS CIENCIAS HUMANAS Y TECNOLÓGICAS PARA LA INTEGRACIÓN EN EL CONOSUR, de 2 a 4 de mayo de 2013, en la ciudad de Bogotá, Colombia, en la Universidad Sergio Arboleda Bogotá – Colombia.

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