First Girls’ History and Culture Network Newsletter, Fall 2017

From the Editors

This inaugural issue of the Girls’ History & Culture Newsletter includes news provided by members of the newly-organized Girls’ History & Culture Network (GHCN). Established under the auspices of the Society for the History of Children & Youth, the GHCN seeks to foster conversation, communication, and collaboration among scholars, museum professionals, teachers, activists, students, and others interested in girl-focused research, teaching, publishing, pedagogy, policy, politics, etc. It is with these goals in mind that the Newsletter draws upon familiar categories — publications, conferences, exhibits, podcasts, activism, teaching, blogs, etc. — to organize information about relevant professional activities we expect will be useful to current members and of interest to potential Network participants.

We fully anticipate adding, splicing, and consolidating sections in response to the changing needs and desires of the GHCN membership. We very much welcome your suggestions, submissions, as well as participation in the production of the Newsletter and other GHCN initiatives. By sending this newsletter on to others you will be contributing to the goals of The Girls’ History & Culture Network.

Your co-chairs,

Miriam Forman-Brunell
Professor of History
UMKC
Forman-BrunellM@umkc.edu

Ashley Remer
Founder/Head Girl
Girl Museum
ashley@girlmuseum.org


Network News

Launching the Girls’ History and Culture Network

From the founding of the Society for the History of Children & Youth (SHCY) in 2001 to our most recent conference in 2017, scholars and graduate students have energetically presented historically-grounded, girl-focused scholarly research. We have participated in panel discussions on the history of girlhoods, girls’ cultures, and the lived experiences of girls from international, intersectional, and interdisciplinary perspectives.
In so doing, we have contributed to the development of Girls’ Studies, history and other fields, while also furthering the mission of SHCY. This past summer, SHCY’s launch of the “Network and Working Groups Initiative” provided those of us interested in girls’ history and culture with an unprecedented opportunity to establish organizational space and an intellectual presence.

The newly-established Girls’ History & Culture Network aims to:

  • foster conversation, communication, and collaboration among scholars, museum professionals, teachers, activists, students, and others interested in girl-focused research, teaching, publishing, pedagogy, policy, politics, etc.
  • increase professional recognition of the historical significance of girls and girlhoods within Children’s Studies, Youth Studies, the field of history, and across disciplinary and geographical boundaries
  • promote the use of historical analysis and methods within Girls’ Studies scholarship
    increase public awareness of the significance of girls in history, cultures, and societies
    create and circulate girl-centered papers and web materials, newsletters, pamphlets, statements, digital and audio recordings, and guest edit special issues of the Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth
  • sponsor girls’ history and culture panels, business meetings, receptions, field trips, presentations, workshops, roundtables, lectures, mentoring sessions, activism, “mini conferences,” etc.
  • generate networking opportunities with other girl-focused interest groups
    increase the diversity of SHCY membership to include more scholars, museum professionals, teachers, activists, students, and others interested in girls’ history and culture

To those ends, The Girls’ History & Culture Network seeks to provide members with opportunities to:

  • communicate with others via a designated content-sharing portal on the SHCY website (already in the works)
  • receive priority when establishing roundtables, panels, or other sessions at SHCY biennial conferences
  • propose special issues for the Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth
    produce edited collections, and advance academic programming for the study of girls and female adolescents
  • work collaboratively to win grants, hold regional or topic-specific colloquia
    co-curate digital exhibits and engage in other collaborations with Girl Museum (the first and only museum in the world dedicated to celebrating girls and girlhood)


  • WANT TO JOIN THE GHCN? HERE’S HOW

    We invite all scholars, students, library and museum professionals, teachers, activists, and writers to join The Girls’ History & Culture Network (GHCN). Participation is open to SHCY members. If you are not yet a member—or if your membership has lapsed—please join the Society for the History of Children and Youth by clicking here: http://shcyhome.org/membership/SHCY membership covers a two-year period—includes a 24-month subscription (including the online version) to the Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth, access to the SHCY members’ directory, and eligibility to present at the biennial conferences.

    After joining SHCY, send an email to Forman-BrunellM@umkc.edu to be added to GHCN membership list.


    PUBLICATIONS

    Wendy Rouse, Her Own Hero: The Origins of the Women’s Self-Defense Movement. New York University Press, 2017.

    Her Own Hero

    At the turn of the twentieth century, women famously organized to demand greater social and political freedoms like gaining the right to vote. However, few realize that the Progressive Era also witnessed the birth of the women’s self-defense movement. It is nearly impossible in today’s day and age to imagine a world without the concept of women’s self defense. Some women were inspired to take up boxing and jiu-jitsu for very personal reasons that ranged from protecting themselves from attacks by strangers on the street to rejecting gendered notions about feminine weakness and empowering themselves as their own protectors. Women’s training in self defense was both a reflection of and a response to the broader cultural issues of the time, including the women’s rights movement and the campaign for the vote. Perhaps more importantly, the discussion surrounding women’s self-defense revealed powerful myths about the source of violence against women and opened up conversations about the less visible violence that many women faced in their own homes.

    Through self-defense training, women debunked patriarchal myths about inherent feminine weakness, creating a new image of women as powerful and self-reliant. Whether or not women consciously pursued self-defense for these reasons, their actions embodied feminist politics. Although their individual motivations may have varied, their collective action echoed through the twentieth century, demanding emancipation from the constrictions that prevented women from exercising their full rights as citizens and human beings. This book is a fascinating and comprehensive introduction to one of the most important women’s issues of all time.

    To order and to read the Intro, click here.

    Wendy Rouse, Ph.D Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, San Jose State University


    Emilie D. Zaslow. Playing with America’s Doll: A Critical Analysis of the American Girl Doll Collection. Palgrave MacMillan, 2017.

    Playing with America's Doll

    This critical account of the American Girl brand explores what its books and dolls communicate to girls about femininity, racial identity, ethnicity, and what it means to be an American. Emilie Zaslow begins by tracing the development of American Girl and situates the company’s growth and popularity in a social history of girl power media culture. She then weaves analyses of the collection’s narrative and material representations with qualitative research on mothers and girls. Examining the dolls with both a critical eye and a fan’s curiosity, Zaslow raises questions about the values espoused by this iconic American brand.

    To order the book or just a chapter and read the Intro click this link:
    http://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137566485

    Emilie Zaslow, Ph.D
    Associate Professor
    Communication Studies
    Co-Director, Dyson Women’s Leadership Initiative
    Pace University
    ezaslow@pace.edu


    Kristine Alexander, Guiding Modern Girls: Girlhood, Empire, and Internationalism in the 1920s and 1930s. University of British Columbia Press, November 2017.

    Guiding Modern Girls

    Across the British empire and the world, the 1920s and 1930s were a time of unprecedented social and cultural change. Girls and young women were at the heart of many of these shifts. Out of this milieu, the Girl Guide movement emerged as a response to modern concerns about gendfer, race, class, and social instability. In this book, Kristine Alexander analyzes the ways in which Guiding sought to mold young people in England, Canada, and India. It is a fascinating account that connects the histories of girlhood, internationalism, and empire, while asking how girls and young women understood and responded to Guiding’s attempts to lead them toward a “useful” feminine future.

    For more information and a sample chapter, click here.

    Kristine Alexander, PhD. Canada Research Chair in Child and Youth Studies Assistant Professor of History Director, Institute for Child and Youth Studies (I-CYS) Co-Editor, Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures, The University of Lethbridge.


    Shenila Khoja-Moolji, Forging the Ideal Educated Girl: The Production of Desirable Subjects in Muslim South Asia. University of California Press, June, 2018.

    Forcing the Ideal Educated Girl

    For more information and ordering, click here.

    Dr. Shenila Khoja-Moolji
    The Alice Paul Center for Research on
    Gender, Sexuality and Women
    The University of Pennsylvania


    Mary Jo Maynes [with Ann Waltner], “Young Women, Textile Labour, and Marriage in Europe and China around 1800” in A History of the Girl: Formation, Education and Identity. Edited by Mary O’Dowd and June Purvis (Palgrave, 2018)

    Silk spinnery workforce at Jurjurieux in southern France, ca. 1900. 
Original source: Photograph by Claudius Corne issued as a postcard entitled “Personnel interne de la Maison C.J. Bonnet, á Jujurieux (Ain). <a href=http://patrimoines.ain.fr/n/memoire-ouvriere/n:174#p468” />



    CONFERENCES

    A Report on the 2017 Global History of Black Girlhood Conference

    by CORINNE FIELDS, Ph.D University of Virginia

    The Global History of Black Girlhood Conference held at the University of Virginia in March, 2017, brought together more than 150 people from 70 institutions to consider the experiences of black girls from the seventeenth century to the present in Africa, Europe, and the Americas. The conference was organized by LaKisha Simmons (University of Michigan), Abosede George (Barnard College), and Corinne Field (University of Virginia). More than 20 presenters offered scholarly papers, artwork, and films exploring broad themes such as pleasure, play, kinship, trauma, healing and activism.

    Through conversations that bridged disciplines, regions, and time periods, participants considered how to place black girls’ history in a diasporic framework, what “blackness” has meant in different times and places, and how various people define what it means to be a girl. For the keynote panel, activists from the US and South Africa reflected on youth, justice, and girlhood.

    Participants were Beverly Palesa Ditsie, co-founder of the Gay and Lesbian Organization of Witwatersrand (GLOW), South Africa; Phindile Kunene, former member of the Young Communist League and South African Student Congress; Janaé Bonsu, National Public Policy Chair of the Black Youth Project (BYP) 100; Denise Oliver-Velez, former member of the Young Lords and the Black Panther Party.

    Round table participants including LaKisha Simmons (left), an assistant professor of history and women’s studies at the U. of Michigan at Ann Arbor.
Photos credit: Michael Bailey

    In a wide-ranging and frank conversation moderated by Claudrena Harold, University of Virginia, panelists talked about the factors that pull girls and young women into activism early in life, the challenges they face, and the strategies upon which they can draw to create change. As part of the conference program, students in grades six through twelve from Charlottesville city schools presented a documentary film that they produced under the direction of Abigail Akosua Kayser, a Ph.D. student in the Curry School of Education, with the collaboration of City of Promise, UVA Arts Mentors, and Light House Studios. The students interviewed local black women leaders about how black girls can overcome challenges and stereotypes. An Undergraduate Symposium enabled students from Harvard University, Amherst College, Columbia University, and the University of Virginia to present paintings, poetry, and scholarly research.

    A special reception following this event brought together undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty. The conference concluded with a reading by novelist Tayari Jones, author of Silver Sparrow. Sponsored by the NEA Big Read and the Jefferson Madison Regional Libraries, this event enabled a panel of local high school students to ask Jones questions about the novel, her writing strategies, and her future projects. Simmons and Field will be editing an anthology of essays developed by the presenters at the conference as well as a special issue of the Journal Women, Gender and Families of Color. The History of Black Girlhood Network continues as an informal collaboration among scholars. Those interested in joining should email Corinne Field.

    • A video of the keynote panel is available here
    • View a trailer of the film Black Girlhood: Access and Assets
    • Read more about The History of Black Girlhood Network in The Chronicle for Higher Education.

    REBECCA R. NOEL, of Plymouth State University in New Hampshire, presented “Girls Deformed and Reformed by School: Spinal Curvature, Female Exercise, and Healthy Schooling in 19th-Century Britain and the United States” at the 2017 Society for the History of Childhood and Youth conference at Rutgers University — Camden. This presentation traced worries about spinal curvature among female students in Britain and the United States, both in physicians’ and educators’ discourse and in educational practice. It also explored how girls themselves responded to such programs.

    Beginning in the late eighteenth century, European physicians developed increasing interest in child health. Orthopedics formed one area of focus, and spinal curvature received special attention. By the 1820s, British and American physicians concluded that school in particular was causing spinal curvature in girls.

    This explanation recast an ancient fear that the scholarly lifestyle, in teachers and students, inevitably led to ill health. Concerns about scholarly frailty had taken many forms over the centuries: weakness, melancholy, dyspepsia, neurological derangement, and, starting in the early nineteenth century, pulmonary consumption. Spinal curvature was the first scholarly symptom to apply uniquely to girls and women. Boston physician John Collins Warren advised the American Institute of Instruction in 1830 that half of the educated women he knew, but none of the men, had curved spines. Warren and others blamed how schools and parents treated girls’ bodies. With increasing modern conveniences, middle-class girls pursued advanced education instead of taxing physical housework. After school, though, girls headed into their houses for sedentary needlework and similar duties. But boys (again not including the poor) ran and played after school, mitigating the health effects of their long hours at the desk. In response to this problem, educators instituted mechanical manipulations and exercise programs designed to straighten out their female students.

    Noel’s work on girls is part of her research on schooling and health. Her article “‘No Wonder They Are Sick, and Die of Study’: European Fears for the Scholarly Body and Health in New England Schools Before Horace Mann” appears in the Paedagogica Historica Special Issue on Education and the Body (online August 2017, print March 2018).


    MADELEINE DOBSON, of Curtin University, recently presented Appreciating the Emotional Ties Young Girls Share with Their Media at the Western Australian Institute for Educational Research Conference in Fremantle, Western Australia. She also presented, Hayley’s Story: Exploring a Junior Primary Student’s Relationship with Media, at the Digitising Early Childhood International Conference in Perth, Western Australia.

    Madeleine Dobson Ph.D., B.Ed. (ECE/Hons.)
    Lecturer, School of Education
    Faculty of Humanities, Curtin University
    Western Australia.

    MIRIAM FORMAN-BRUNELL, University of Missouri-Kansas City, is presenting “Girls’ Economies and Girlhood Cultures: Working, Performing, Playing,” at the Midwestern Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association conference, in St. Louis, MO, Oct 18-22, 2017. Forman-Brunell is also the Girls’ Culture/Girlhoods Area Chair for the MPC/ACA. This paper draws upon the Introduction to Girls’ Economies & Girlhood Cultures: On the Borders of Work and Play, a scholarly collection co-edited with Diana Anselmo, featuring the work of a number of GHCN members.

    Upcoming

    KATHRYN GLEADLE is organizing the workshop, “Girlhood, Travel and Global issues: A Multi-Disciplinary Workshop’. University of Oxford, 14 March 2018.

    EMILY HAMILTON-HONEY
    , SUNY Canton, will be presenting her paper, “The Hackett-Lowther Unit With the French Army at Compiégne; or, the Historical Counterparts to Edna Brooks’ Khaki Girls.” Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association Conference, Indianapolis, IN, March 28-31, 2018.

    The Khakhi Girls of the Motor Corps

    MARY JO MAYNES, is co-organizer of the research circle “Subjects, Objects, Agents: Young People’s Lives and Livelihoods in the Global South” based at the Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change at the University of Minnesota. They will be holding a conference in May 2018. Click here for more information.

    SCHY 2019
    It’s not too early to start networking with partners, plan papers, organize panels, and develop presentations for the next biennial SHCY conference to be held in Sydney, Australia, in June 2019


    EXHIBITIONS

    Children’s Victorian Library Collection Unveiled in Orkney

    Maria Cowan, 12, her 10-year-old sister Clara, and their young cousin Isabella Bremner began producing their own library in 1864, sometimes with the help of other children. They named it Minervian Library and it is held at Orkney Library and Archive. A selection of the short stories, fairytales, poems, plays and newspaper articles is now on display in the Orkney Museum in Kirkwall. The exhibition was a collaborative venture between Orkney Archives, Orkney Museum and Kathryn Gleadle. Kathryn Gleadle is also co-authoring with Beth Rogers, “’A Library of Our Own Compositions’: The Minervian Library and Girlhood Creativity in Victorian Orkney.”

    Click to read the article published by BBC News.

    Classical Girls’ at Girl Museum

    What was life like for a girl in Classical Greece and Rome? Classical Greece and Rome are often called the birthplaces of Western history. During the period from 500 BCE to 250 CE, these civilizations flourished – bringing about achievements in fields like art, medicine, and philosophy that continue to influence us today. Evidence about young girls during this time can readily be found. Yet many museums do not include their stories. In this exhibit, we bring the girls of Classical Greece and Rome to life – showing how their daily lives were similar and different, both from each other and from our modern lives. Travel back with us and discover the surprisingly complex lives of girls.

    Visit the exhibition here.

    Contact Ashley E Remer for more information about Girl Museum as well as possible partnerships and collaborations.



    Podcasts & Blogs

    Pirouettes from the Past

    Listen to Melissa Klapper’s podcast, Pirouettes from the Past, tracing the history of ballet in America. The latest episode examines the history of dance recitals. Click here to listen to this episode along with previous instalments.


    Girl Speak

    GirlSpeak, produced by Girl Museum, is a monthly podcast about girls’ history, art, and culture. We explore topics like how girls are represented in art and museums, mythological stories and folktales, our favorite stories about awesome girls, and special topics related to our exhibitions and programs.

    Listen to our newest episode to celebrate the International Day of the Girl called ‘Girls in the Museum’. GirlSpeak is available at iTunes and http://girlmuseum.podbean.com/.


    LA Review of Books BLARB

    LA Review of Books BLARB
    The ‘New’ Muslim Woman: Fashionista and Suspect
    by Shenila Khoja-Moolji

    From the notorious Pepsi commercial and H&M’s video promoting their recycling project, to the cover of Vogue Arabia and CR Fashion Book, women donning the hijab are acquiring greater media visibility than ever before. On the face of it, this is a welcome development. For decades, feminist scholars and activists have been working towards disrupting the trope of the Muslim women as silent, submissive, and somehow uniquely oppressed. The growing prevalence of these new images hints at the potential to re-shape imaginations and open up possibilities for Muslim women, particularly in the West. Unfortunately, the reality is that these images are actually limiting and oppressive. Read more here.

    GHCN is your network. Send us any news, publications, announcements, conference notices, podcasts, blogs, CFP, etc., and we will share them with our community. We will be publishing this newsletter on a quarterly basis, with informal announcements sent out as emails or via social media.

JHCY Best Article Prize for 2016

From James Marten, JHCY, editor

The JHCY Best Article Prize selection committee (MJ Maynes, Rebecca Friedman, and Birgitte Soland) has selected the winner and one honorable mention for Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth Best Article Prize for 2016. The winner receives a certificate and $250.

Winner:
Sarah Walters: “’Child! Now You Are’: Identity Registration, Labor, and the Definition of Childhood in Colonial Tanganyika, 1910-1950”

Sarah Walters’ exceptionally well written article manages the trick of being both conceptually sophisticated and absolutely accessible to non-specialist audiences. Her article traces child labor in colonial Tanganyika over the first half of the 20th century and argues that the variations in and ambiguity of definitions of childhood had many repercussions, including the institutional inability to implement child labor legislation. At the same time, Walters explains, this lack of a singular definition of childhood meant that children could exert themselves and claim agency over their own economic futures by working and increasing their financial security. This complex view of colonial processes is one of the most impressive aspects of this multifaceted research piece. By using evidence from the archives including inspection reports, legislative debates, newspapers, and anthropological investigations, Walters aptly challenges the notion that western definitions of childhood were imposed on colonial subjects wholesale; rather what we find is the degree to which children and youth in colonial Tanganyika were able to act as somewhat autonomous agents, using western-oriented definitions and rules to their own advantage. In addition to its historical originality, this scholarship will be useful and stimulating to any reader intrigued with wider present-day discussions about empowerment, agency, and the politics of development and also about human rights – including children’s rights.

Honorable Mention:
Susan Miller: “Assent as Agency in the Early Years of the Children of the American Revolution”

This excellent article on children’s participation in the group Children of the American Revolution, which was affiliated with the Daughters of the American Revolution, does a marvelous job of offering complex and creative ways of approaching the question of agency in childhood studies. In particular, Miller complicates dichotomous understandings of agency by suggesting that there is a “continuum from opposition to assent” when it comes to children asserting themselves, rather that imagining agency as a simple matter of having it or not having it.

The SHCY invites members to organize regional networks (or) field working-groups.

WHY CALL FOR REGIONAL NETWORKS & WORKING-GROUPS?
SHCY regional networks or field-specific working-groups are a means for researchers to engage in long-term projects under SHCY auspices with a defined focus or approach to the historical study of childhood and youth. They may be defined geographically, by nation states, by languages; by various groups, institutions, or discourses (girlhood, education, race, psychology, etc.); by conceptual or methodological focal points (popular culture, social movements, governmentality, demography, oral history, etc.); or by period (early-modern, Victorian, post-WWII, etc.).

We hope member-created networks and working-groups will allow scholars to create spaces for their extraordinarily diverse interests at our conferences, within our journal, and through other activities. If members develop them avidly, they may enhance the relevance of our events and publications for specific regional and field connections and collaborations, while maintaining the Society’s commitment to serve as a larger umbrella for international, interdisciplinary exchanges in the history of childhood and youth.

WHAT BENEFITS MIGHT NETWORKS & GROUPS PROVIDE?
SHCY regional networks or SHCY field-specific working-groups will receive priority treatment when establishing roundtable, panels, or other sessions at our biennial conferences. They will have access to SHCY website for posting content (a website that receives many thousands of discrete visitors each month). Such groups and networks may propose special issues for the Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth. Recognition as a standing network or working group may help our members work collaboratively to win grants, hold regional or topically specific colloquium, produce edited collections, and even advance academic programming in the study of childhood and youth at our Universities and Colleges.

WHAT’S THE PROCESS FOR STARTING A SHCY NETWORK OR WORKING-GROUP?
Step 1: Discuss your idea and gather interest with colleagues in your regional, topical, period, or theoretical area. Read the relevant SHCY by-law (Article V) below and at http://shcyhome.org/about/

Step 2: Come up with a name, a chair or co-chairs, produce a statement of purpose for your network or working-group. Gather c.v.’s and consider immediate steps or activities you would like to do together.

Step 3: Send to SHCY President your statement of purpose, name the chair or co-chair with a 300-500 word prospectus about your plans. Proposals should include the c.v.’s of 3 to 5 colleagues committed to the project, but may name other interested scholars.

Step 4: SHCY President will present proposals for regional networks or area working-groups to the Executive Committee for evaluation; and will communicate the Executive’s response back to the applicants.

Step 5: Once approved, begin working and producing scholarly goods in collaboration with others. Continue to consult with SHCY officers and conference organizers.

Sincerely Yours,
Patrick Ryan
SHCY President
pryan2@uwo.ca

—————————————–
Relevant SHCY By-Law:

Article V

Section 1: Any SHCY member may propose for approval by SHCY Executive Committee a standing working-group or regional network of the Society.

Section 2: SHCY working groups and regional networks would report to SHCY Executive Committee, and will share the following features:
A – a chair or co-chairs.
B – a statement of purpose.

Section 3: Participation in the working-groups’ or networks’ activities ordinarily will require SHCY membership. Specific practices will be developed in consultation with the Executive Committee.

Section 4: Funds raised by the working-groups or networks (outside of SHCY membership) will be accounted for, dispensed, and held by the groups or networks.

Fass-Sandin Best Article Prize (English) for 2017 Awarded!

Please join me in congratulating Dr. Brian Rouleau who has been awarded the 2017 Fass-Sandin Best Article Prize (English) for his article: ” ‘In Praise of Trash’: Series Fiction Fan Mail and the Challenges of Children’s Devotion.” Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth 9 (Fall 2016): 403-423.

The prize committee was unanimous in their selection of Dr. Rouleau’s article and their citation reads:
“Brian Rouleau’s article ” ‘In Praise of Trash’: Series Fiction Fan Mail and the Challenges of Children’s Devotion” is the winner of SHCY’s 2016 Fass-Sandin Prize for Best Article in English. Rouleau’s deeply researched article draws on neglected archival materials to explore children’s responses to the series literature generated by Edward Stratemeyer’s literary syndicate. By analyzing young readers’ letters to the authors of these series, Rouleau not only addresses the reception of children’s genre literature by the intended audience but also demonstrates that the children sometimes had an effect on future story elements and plots. Children sometimes appreciated but also sometimes resisted the gender norms and imperialist tropes embedded in the various series. By recovering their voices, Rouleau presents a model for how scholars can interrogate the interaction between writers and even young readers. This lively, well-written article thus contributes to the scholarship of reader reception as well as the history of children’s literature during the early twentieth century.”

2017 Outreach Grant Winners

The Society for the History of Children and Youth is pleased to announce the selections for 2017 Outreach Grants:

  1. Dr. Silke Hackenesch (University of Kassel) for the international conference “Designing Modern Families: International Perspectives on ‘Intercountry’ and Transracial Adoptions” (Nov 1718, 2017).
  2. M.J. Maynes (University of Minnesota) for a visit by Dr. Samia Khatun (McKenzie Postdoctoral Research Fellow, School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne, Australia) to the University of Minnesota to present a workshop and a public lecture on her current research project, a 400-year history of girls and young women (mostly between the ages of 13 and 21) engaged in textile work in what is now Bangladesh (late October, 2017).
  3. Graduate student grant: Victoria Holec, for a full-day interdisciplinary symposium at the Institute for Child & Youth Studies (I-CYS), University of Lethbridge, At the Intersections of Childhood Symposium, on the intersections of digital, Indigenous, and youth issues (April 1, 2017).

Many thanks to the Outreach Committee Members for 2017:

Stephanie Olsen, Chair

Nell Musgrove

Pablo Toro Blanco

JHCY Seeking Editor

The Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth (JHCY) is seeking a new editor! This is an exciting opportunity to be involved with the most important journal in our field.

The JHCY is published by Johns Hopkins Press and is the official journal of the SHCY. From the website: The JHCY “explores the development of childhood and youth cultures and the experiences of young people across diverse times and places. JHCY embraces a wide range of historical methodologies as well as scholarship in other disciplines that share a historical focus. The Journal publishes original articles based on empirical research and essays that place contemporary issues of childhood and youth in a historical context. Each issue also includes an ‘object lesson’ on the material culture of childhood, contemporary policy pieces, and relevant book reviews.”

The duties of the editor include:

  • recruiting articles and object lessons
  • managing the peer review process through the online ScholarOne system
  • copyediting all articles and object lessons, and proofreading book reviews
  • ensuring that authors submit illustrations and permissions to publish text and      illustration
  • supervising copyeditor and proofreader
  • procuring cover illustrations
  • submitting annual reports to the JHCY Board and SHCY members (including a budget)
  • appointing the committee that awards the Best Article Prize for the JHCY
  • submitting JHCY nominations for Fass-Sandin Prize
  • maintaining communication with the President of the Society

 

The JHCY is published three times a year. Deadlines for submitting completed issues are March 1, July 1, and November 1. The editorship position has followed different successful models, from one person to a committee of three. Currently, the book review section is co-edited by Cori Field and Nick Syrett. For additional information concerning the position, please contact current editor Professor James Marten at james.marten@marquette.edu.

The Society recognizes this as considerable (unpaid) labour. This may be offset through course releases given by the editor’s (or editors’) institution(s).

Start date is negotiable but ideally the new editor(s) would be ready to take on full responsibility for the July 2018 issue.

Statement of interest and applications [including relevant experience] should be addressed to the JHCY editor search committee through Tamara Myers (tamaramyers@gmail.com); we aim to have the position filled by July 1, 2017.

Outreach Grant Competition Open

Our 2017 Outreach Grant competition is now open!

The SHCY will award two $500 grants for events that take place in 2017 to projects deemed worthy by the Outreach and Executive Committees of the SHCY.

The $500 grants will help defray expenses for speakers, workshops, and other scholarly events fully or partially devoted to the history of children and youth.

Possible uses:
•Keynote speakers or panelists
•Receptions
•Printed materials
•Publicity
•Support for students attending the event

Application deadline for both grants: February 28, 2017.

Terms of the grants:
•Applicants must be members of SHCY. (See http://shcyhome.org/membership/ for membership information.)
•Recipients of 2015 and 2016 Outreach Grants cannot receive 2017 grants, and no one may apply for more than one 2017 grant.
•Funds will be distributed directly to host departments or institutions prior to the event.
•SHCY must be acknowledged as co-sponsor on all print and web-based materials and announcements, and, when appropriate, in speaker introductions. When possible, use the SHCY logo and link to the SHCY website.
•SHCY must be sent PDFs or links to announcements and promotional materials before the event.
•A report must be submitted to the chairs of the Outreach Committee no later than thirty days after the funded event. It should consist of the following:
—Blog post describing the event for use on the SHCY website
—Summary of the attendance (size, makeup)
—Copy of appropriate printed materials or screenshots of websites
—Description of the actual expenses covered by the grant

Note: If the event funded by the grant is part of a larger conference or other function, the funded portion of the conference must be identified as discrete portions of the program and labeled as co-sponsored by SHCY.

One-page applications should be submitted as PDF files via email to the Outreach Committee chair Stephanie Olsen (stephanie.olsen@mcgill.ca). They should include:
—Date, location, and primary sponsor of event
—Description of audience (size, makeup)
—Total cost of event and other confirmed or potential funding sources
—Description of event that articulates how it contributes to all or part of SHCY’s mission: promoting the history of children and youth by supporting research about childhood, youth cultures, and the experience of young people across diverse times and places; fostering study across disciplinary and methodological boundaries; providing venues for scholars to communicate with one another; and promoting excellence in scholarship.
–Note: The Committee may request additional information from applicants about their event and about the participants and intended audience.

The Outreach Committee will recommend awardees to the SHCY Executive Committee, which will make final decisions. Recipients of grants will be announced by March 13, 2017.

Questions about the Outreach Grant competition can be directed to the Chair, Stephanie Olsen, at stephanie.olsen@mcgill.ca

SHCY Elections – Congratulations to our new officers!

Thank you to the many SHCY members willing to stand for our recent officer elections. Our new officers include:

Vice-President (President Elect): Tamara Myers

Executive Committee: Valeria Manzano, Kristine Moruzi and Emma Alexander

Outreach Committee: Stephanie Olsen (Chair), Nell Musgrove, and Pablo Toro Blanco

A special debt of gratitude to our Nominating Committee who recruited so many excellent candidates for our election: Margot Hillel (Chair), Mary Hatfield, and Orna Naftali.

Congratulations to our all!

Miriam Turrini Wins Fass-Sandin Prize for Best Article in German or Italian!

It is with great pleasure that the committee for the Fass-Sandin Prize for the best article (German or Italian) on the History of Children and Youth for 2015 announces that the award goes to Miriam Turrini for her wonderful essay “Poco oltre la soglia: racconti autobiografici di aspiranti gesuiti a metà Seicento, Studi storici3/2014, July –Sept., pp. 585-614.  Congratulations Dr. Turrini!

The Prize Committee wrote:
Within a varied field, Turrini’s article stood out for the richness and productivity of the sources used, as well as for the methodological and conceptual issues that her work raises for the study of the history of childhood and youth in early modern Europe.The article is based on a meticulous archival research, whose main focus are the questionnaires compiled between 1636 and 1644 by young aspiring Jesuits admitted to noviciate of S.Andrea, in Rome. Out of the 180 questionnaires available, 82 include the novices’ narratives of their vocation. It is on the sources combining questionnaires and vocational stories that Turrini’s analysis is constructed.
The author presents us with an extraordinary source from a period in which the voices of young people remain elusive and difficult to find. These sources provide information on the background and life experiences of these young people, together with the narration of the discovery of their vocation and subsequent decision to enter the noviciate. Most of the aspiring Jesuits were between 14 and 18 years olds, they came from various Italian and European territories, and from various family backgrounds. Only a minority came from either very rich or very poor family, and many of them were orphans of one or both parents. Young adults rather than children, their testimonies provide precious glimpses into the complicated transition from childhood to adulthood, which in these cases coincided with the equally complicated passage from their “old” secular life to their new life as novices in the Compagnia di Gesù.

While the narratives studied by Turrini follow a recognisable scheme, the sources offer important insights into the individuality and subjectivity of young people engaged in a process of self-analysis and self-representation.

In order to successfully complete the probation period, the aspiring Jesuits had to answer questions relating to their past, and had to present a vision of their future, seen as a project of self-realisation that should coincide with the obtainment of Christian perfection.

Although inevitably informed by the need to satisfy the expectations of their examiners, the sources studied by Turrini show the complicated effort to narrate a radical life project: a project that required young people not only to resist worldly temptations but also to defy parental opposition. Only in a few cases, in fact, we find examples of solicited or even forced conversions, pursued as part of family strategies.

Turrini compare texts written by a majority of younger novices with the texts written by (fewer) older writers, thus highlighting both the specificity of younger people’s voices and experiences and the methodological and theoretical issues brought up by the sources.

The essay by Turrini represented an initial approach to this type of egodocuments, which have since been studied further. The article is bound to promote further historiographical reflections on the categories relevant to the history of youth in Europe.

Many thanks to the Prize Commitee: Patrizia Guarnieri (chair, University of Florence), Stefania Bernini (UNSW Australia), Patrizia Dogliani (University of Bologna), Dirk Schumann (chair, University of Göttingen)

Catherine Jones wins 2016 Grace Abbott Book Prize

The Society for the History of Children and Youth Grace Abbott Book Prize for the best book on the History of Children and Youth published in English in 2015

The 2016 Grace Abbott Book Prize committee has selected Catherine Jones’s Intimate Reconstructions: Children in Postemancipation Virginia (University of Virginia Press) as the best book on the history of children, childhood or youth published in English in 2015. In their citation, the Committee wrote:

“Jones’ study is an outstanding example of what happens when a researcher approaches a familiar historical narrative from a child-centered perspective. Based on meticulous, extensive and creative archival research, and successfully blending traditional social history with novel analytic categories, Intimate Reconstructions reveals not only how children in Virginia were affected by the process of Reconstruction, but also how Reconstruction itself was shaped by concerns and debates about the treatment, training, reformation and protection of children.

Jones convincingly claims that children, both as direct participants and as cultural symbols, were central to postemancipation struggles over the meaning of freedom, victory and defeat; kinship and citizenship, and the interplay of public and private life.

By attending to the diversity of children’s postwar experiences (in the households of formerly enslaved people and former slaveholders, as apprentices or institutionalized orphans, in the new public schools), to whatchildren had in common as a group (age) and what divided them (race, class, and gender), Jones offers a rich and subtle account ofthe social, political and emotional gains and costs of emancipation. Intimate Reconstructions is an original contribution to the histories of Reconstruction and children, but its detailed storytelling, compelling and clear arguments, and important lessons on the interdependence of private and public—of families and the political and economic contexts in which they are embedded—give it a much broader appeal as well.”

Thank you to the members of the Grace Abbott Prize Committee for their service, Adriana Benzaquén (chair, Mount St. Vincent University), Nara Milanich (Barnard College), and Hugh Morrison (University of Otago).

by Mona Gleason, President, Society for the History of Children and Youth

Lydia Murdoch wins Fass-Sandin Prize (English)

The Society for the History of Children and Youth Fass-Sandin Prize for the best article (in English) on the History of Children and Youth published in 2015

It is with great pleasure that the committee for the Fass-Sandin Prize for the best article (in English) on the History of Children and Youth published in 2015 announces that the award goes to Lydia Murdoch for her wonderful essay “Carrying the Pox: The Use of Children and Ideals of Childhood in Early British and Imperial Campaigns Against Smallpox,” Journal of Social History, vol. 48, no. 3 (Spring 2015), pp. 511-535. The Committee wrote:

“In a strong and varied field, Lydia Murdoch’s essay stood out for us not only because of the fascinating story she tells – of the use of children as carriers of smallpox vaccines around the globe in the early nineteenth century – but also as a result of her careful attentiveness to the multiple ways in which the category of childhood was made and remade in intersection with ideas relating to class, race, and gender. What she demonstrates is that shifting conceptualisations of childhood in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries facilitated both the increasing social acceptance, as well as the dissemination, of vaccination. New ideas about childhood innocence were, as Murdoch notes, ‘flexible’. The concept of the pure, innocent child was crucial to popularising and legitimating vaccination particularly among middle- and upper-class parents: vaccination was a sign of their love and care for their children. But, equally, in their innocence, children’s bodies were believed to offer doctors and scientists a tabula rasa on which to test anti-smallpox treatments. Perhaps unsurprisingly, children who were poor, black, and without the protection of their parents were particularly useful for officials and doctors working to make the smallpox vaccine widely available. Murdoch charts the journeys by land and sea of a group of child vectors of the vaccine, whose bodies and work allowed imperial authorities to paint the British Empire as a benevolent parent of people around the globe, but whose treatment and living conditions were certainly well below those afforded to white, middle-class children.

By dint of their innocence – and vulnerability – children were, then, significant to the extension of scientific and medical knowledge, and also to the making and entrenchment of imperial rule. This is an article that asks us to think carefully about how unstable age categories are crucial to the workings of power.”

Thank you to the prize committee Sarah Duff, University of Witwaterand; Daniel Grey, Plymouth University; and Leroy Rowe, University of Southern Maine for their service.

by Mona Gleason (President, Society for the History of Children and Youth)

Johns Hopkins University Press Features Latest Issue of JHCY

Johns Hopkins University Press has featured the latest issue of JHCY on their blog.

From the piece:

Late last year, the Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth published a special issue which took a look at the thorny subject of child death. Kathleen Jones organized a discussion of young people and death at the 2013 conference for the Society for the History of Children and Youth, the sponsoring organization for the journal. This event drove the creation of the special issue. Jones, Associate Professor of History and Director of Graduate Studies at Virginia Tech, served as guest editor for the issue with Vassar College Associate Professor of History and Director of Victorian Studies Lydia Murdoch and Tamara Myers, Associate Professor of History at the University of British Columbia. The trio provided collective answers for a Q&A session.

Read the full interview.

2016 Outreach Grant Winners Announced

The successful applicants for the 2016 Outreach Grants are:

$500.00 Grant
Conference, submitted by Dr. Gulay Yilmaz, Akdeniz University
Title: “History of Childhood in the Ottoman Empire,”
6-7 May 2016 at Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey

$1,500 Grant
Symposium, submitted by Dr. Kristine Moruzi, Deakin University
Title: “Literary, Cultural, Social: (Re) Examining Historical Childhoods – An Australasian Society for the History of Children and Youth Symposium,”
7-8 November 2016 at Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia

Congratulations to the applicants and best of luck with your events!
SHCY Outreach Committee:
Luke Springman (chair), Adriana Benzaquen, David Pomfret, Shurlee Swain

Call for Nominations: Fass-Sandin Prize for Best Article (English)

The Society for the History of Children and Youth (SHCY) is pleased to call for nominations for the best article in English on the history of children, childhood, or youth (broadly construed) published in 2015 in a print or online journal. The prize consists of a plaque and a check for $250. The winner will be announced no later than mid-August.
Nominations are invited from publishers, editors, scholars, and authors. Current members of the SHCY award committee are ineligible.

CORRECTION (2/8/16): Please note that current officers of the Society, including Executive Committee, ARE ELIGIBLE for nominations.

Send a PDF or photocopy of the article to Sarah Emily Duff at sarah.duff@wits.ac.za. Please use the following format for the subject line of your email: ‘Fass-Sandin Prize Surname First Name’ (eg. Fass-Sandin Prize Aries Philippe). The deadline for nominations is April 17, 2016.

The committee is comprised of:

Sarah Emily Duff (chair), University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg

Daniel Grey, Plymouth University

Leroy Rowe, University of Southern Maine

Call for Nominations: 2016 Fass-Sandin Prize for Best Article in German or Italian

The Society for the History of Children and Youth (SHCY) is pleased to call for nominations for the best article in German or Italian on the history of children, childhood, or youth (broadly construed) published in a 2013, 2014, or 2015 issue of a print or online journal. The SHCY will grant one award. The prize consists of a plaque and a check for $250. The winner will be announced in early September 2016 on the website of the SHCY. She/he will be informed of the award prior to the announcement. Nominations are invited from publishers, editors, scholars, and authors. Eligibility for the awards is based solely on the language in which the article is published, not on the residence or nationality of the author. Current members of the SHCY award committee are ineligible.

CORRECTION (2/8/16): Please note that current officers of the Society, including Executive Committee, ARE ELIGIBLE for nominations.

The deadline for nominations is April 15, 2016.

Please send a PDF or photocopy of the article to both chairs of the prize committee, Patrizia Guarnieri at patrizia.guarnieri@unifi.it and Dirk Schumann at dschuma@uni-goettingen.de. The third member of the committee is Patrizia Dogliani (Bologna).

Committee Members:

Patrizia Guarnieri (chair)
Department Sagas, of History, Archeology, Geography and Fine Arts
University of Florence -Italy

Dirk Schumann (chair)
Seminar für Mittlere und Neuere Geschichte
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Kulturwissenschaftliches Zentrum
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen- Germany

Patrizia Dogliani (member)
Department of History, Culture and Civilization
University of Bologna-Italy

Call for Nominations: 2016 Grace Abbott Book Prize

The Society for the History of Children and Youth (SHCY) is pleased to call for nominations for the best book published in English on the history of children, childhood, or youth (broadly construed) published in 2015.

The award of a plaque and a check for $500 will be made by mid-summer 2016.

Nominations are invited from publishers, editors, scholars, and authors. Current members of the SHCY award committee are ineligible. Nominations must be postmarked by April 15, 2016.

Send a copy of the book, physical or electronic (PDF only), for consideration to each of the book award committee members at the following addresses:

CORRECTION (2/8/16): Please note that current officers of the Society, including Executive Committee, ARE ELIGIBLE for nominations.

Adriana Benzaquén (Chair)
Department of History
Mount Saint Vincent University
166 Bedford Highway
Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3M 2J6
Canada
adriana.benzaquen@msvu.ca

Nara Milanich
Department of History
Barnard College/Columbia University
3009 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
USA
nmilanic@barnard.edu

Hugh Morrison
College of Education
University of Otago
PO Box 56
Dunedin 9054
New Zealand
hugh.morrison@otago.ac.nz

New Book Review Editors for the JHCY

The editorial board of the Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth has approved the appointments of Corinne T. Field and Nicholas Syrett as co-editors of the journal’s book review section.

Nick is an associate professor at the University of Northern Colorado and author of The Company He Keeps: A History of White College Fraternities (Chapel Hill: UNC Press, 2009) and of a forthcoming study of the regulation of youthful sexuality in the United States.Cori is lecturer in the Department of History and in the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Program at the University of Virginia.  She is the author of The Struggle for Equal Adulthood: Gender, Race, Age, and the Fight for Citizenship in Antebellum America (Chapel Hill: UNC Press, 2014).  Nick and Cori together edited the just-published Age in America: The Colonial Era to the Present (New York: NYU Press, 2015).

Cori and Nick are now recruiting reviewers and commissioning reviews; “their” reviews will begin appearing in the late 2016 edition of the journal.

Caroline Cox

Long-time member and former Executive Committee member Caroline Cox died after a long illness on July 11, 2015.  Caroline, a legendary teacher at the University of the Pacific, was author of The Fight to Survive: A Young Girl, Diabetes, and the Discovery of Insulin (2009) and was writing Boy Soldiers: War and Society in the American Revolution at the time of her death.  Caroline served on the SHCY executive committee from 2011 until 2015.  Read more about her at http://www.pacific.edu/About-Pacific/Newsroom/2014/May-August-2014/Pacific-mourns-loss-of-beloved-professor-Caroline-Cox.html.

2015 Winner of Fass-Sandin Prize (Article in English) Announced!

The Fass-Sandin Prize for the best article (in English) on the History of Children and Youth published in 2014 has been presented to Barbara Young Welke, “The Cowboy Suit Tragedy: Spreading Risk, Owning Hazard in the Modern American Consumer Economy,” Journal of American History (June 2014), 97-121. The prize committee, which consisted of Simon Sleight (chair), Corrie Decker, and Corinne T. Field offered the following about Welke’s article:

Showcasing a remarkable depth of historical analysis, Barbara Young Welke offers a compelling – indeed haunting – account of the position of children at the intersection of sentiment, profit, material culture and legal status. This is at heart a powerful family drama: we meet young Tommy McCormack, playing in his new cowboy costume inside his Manhattan apartment one winter’s evening in 1945. A gift received the previous Christmas, the outfit is so inherently flammable (this the result of cost-cutting, wartime contingency and corporate negligence) that a lick of flame causes instant conflagration. Welke assumes the role of a detective revisiting a crime scene in unraveling a tangle of threads that led ultimately to calamity. Tommy’s childhood and the childhoods of the many other victims of the same corporate tailor serve as catalysts for Welke’s substantive arguments on risk and attempted legal redress. Interrogation of disparate archival sources yields revelatory discussion, the analysis structured throughout with poise and precision. Where Viviana Zelizer charted the changing cultural status of childhood through sources including trial records and insurance documents, Welke offers – through the focus on children’s desires and the calculus of loss – a stark account of nothing less than the modern consumer economy. The article demonstrates how the history of children and childhood need never be a niche concern; it can instead speak to diverse audiences and help rework multiple meta-level narratives.

The committee also recognized an article for Honorable Mention: Emily C. Bruce, ‘“Each word shows how you love me”: The Social Literacy Practice of Children’s Letter Writing (1760-1860)’, Paedagogica Historica, Vol. 50, No. 3 (2014), 247-64.

Congratulations to Barbara and Emily!

Outreach Grant Conference Report: “Child’s Play: Multi-Sensory Histories of Children and Childhood in Japan and Beyond”

From Sabine Frühstück (University of California at Santa Barbara), who organized the workshop:

On February 27-28, 2015, SHCY helped to sponsor an international workshop on “Child’s Play: Multi-Sensory Histories of Children and Childhood in Japan and Beyond” at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Organized by Sabine Frühstück, the workshop brought together scholars from History, Anthropology, Sociology, and Cultural Studies from Europe, Japan, and the United States. The ten papers were organized in several sessions on Playing + Games, Visual + Writing Cultures, and Visual Cultures, and covered the period from medieval to contemporary Japan.

A number of papers explored such questions as how the boundaries between adulthood and childhood have been historically drawn, what the place of play and games have been in education, and how children have been sexed and gendered in different settings. Koresawa Hiroaki (Otsuma Women’s University) and Jinno Yuki (Kanto Gakuin University), both expert of the history of toys and the commercialization of childhood, for instance, examined how the proliferation of certain toys might serve as an indication for the changes of attitudes towards children and childhood. Lizbeth Halliday Piel (University of Manchester), Elise Edwards (Butler University), and Aaron Moore (Manchester University) explored the role of play for children’s self-determination from outside play during wartime Japan to contemporary children’s soccer. In papers on the visual culture of childhood, Harald Salomon (Humboldt University) analyzed the subversive potential of films that featured children in the 1920s and 1930s, Sabine Frühstück (University of California at Santa Barbara) presented a paper about the rhetorical and visual mobilization of child innocence in twentieth century publications, and Noriko Manabe (Princeton University) addressed the role of children’s culture in anti-nuclear protest in the aftermath of the 2011 triple disaster in Northeastern Japan. Papers by Kathryn Goldfarb (McMaster University) and Teruyama Junko (Tsukuba University) took up socio-medical questions regarding children who are institutionalized in child welfare facilities and treatment centers for autistic children. A panel discussion with artist Machida Kumi, cultural studies expert Dick Hebdige and anthropologist Jennifer Robertson about the place of children in contemporary Japanese art constituted the final component of the conference.

Over the course of two days about 200 audience members, including students, scholars, and community members, joined the presenters and engaged in lively discussions. In addition to SHCY, the following institutions and university units provided co-sponsorship: the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, the Division of Humanities and Fine Arts, the Division of Letters and Science, the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center, the East Asian Center, and the departments of Art, East Asian Languages & Cultural Studies, History, Sociology, and Anthropology at the University of California at Santa Barbara. For more information about the conference see: http://www.eastasian.ucsb.edu/projects/childs-play/.

2015 Grace Abbott Book Award Winner Announced

The recipient of the Grace Abbott Book Award for the best book published in the history of children and youth in 2014 is Ellen Boucher’s, Empire’s Children: Child Emigration, Welfare, and the Decline of the British World, 1869–1967 (Cambridge, 2014).

The committee was deeply impressed by Prof. Boucher’s study of how deep cultural understandings of preserving a “greater Britain” were at the center of the emigration of poor children from England to settler communities in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Rhodesia and South Africa between the late 1860s and the late 1960s. The idea that a “civilized” people would countenance the removal of children from their immediate families (even with parental consent) goes dramatically against contemporary understandings about child nurture and family well-being. Yet Boucher’s research painstakingly reconstructs why such an initiative was once considered benevolent, enlightened, and progressive. In addition to giving us a close account of how public officials and other self-appointed “child savers” implemented this vision, oral histories with the adults whose formative years were spent on the last frontiers of the British empire add nuance and complexity to our understanding of how children responded to such enterprises, undertaken without their permission and with a benevolence that had mixed within it the more obviously self-interested motives of adults in London and in the dominion lands. Finally, in accounting for why such efforts came to an end, Empire’s Children adds significantly to our understanding of twentieth century nationalisms, the decolonization process and the evolution of social policy across national borders.

The members of the selection committee were Ben Keppel (chair), Kristine Alexander, and Luke Springman. Prof. Boucher will receive $500 and a plaque.​

2015 Fass-Sandin Award Winners Announced!

Congratulations to the following winners for articles published in Scandinavian languages:

Karin Zetterqvist Nelson, “From children of the Nation to individuals in their own right,” Scandia (2012: 2). Scandia is a peer-reviewed journal for historical research that was founded in 1928 in Lund and publishes Swedish and Nordic research (sometimes also in English). It was founded to promote historical analyses in the Annales School tradition based on critical analyses of primary sources.

Olle Widhe, “’The Battle Is Ours!’ A Study of Olof Fryxell’s Snow Castle: a Tale for Countryside Boys and the Revival of Gothicism in 19th Century Swedish Children’s Literature” (Samlaren 2013). Samlaren is the oldest peer-reviewed, literary journal in Sweden. Published by the Swedish Society for Literature in Uppsala ince 1880, it publishes studies on Swedish and Nordic literature.

Each author will receive a plaque and $250. The selection committee was comprised of Bengt Sandin, Ning de Coninck-Smith, Eva Österberg, and Niels Finn Christiansen.

Current Members Only: 2015 SHCY Election

The 2015 SHCY election is now open and will close at 11:59 pm EST on 30 April, 2015. Votes should be submitted electronically, using the survey-monkey form linked here. The site also provides the names and brief biographies of the 2015 candidates.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/G5B8TDL

Votes may be submitted for six positions in total:
Vice-President/President Elect
Four “at large” members of the Executive Committee
Graduate Student Representative

The elected incoming Executive Committee members will replace the following Current members of the Executive Committee whose terms expire at the 2015 conference in Vancouver:

Caroline Cox
Michael Grossberg
Colin Heywood
Rebecca de Schweinitz
Susan Ecklemann (Graduate Student Representative)

SHCY thanks these members for their leadership service to the organization.

Please note that the final election results will take into account SHCY’s bylaws encouraging geographic diversity for at-large membership on the executive committee. “No more than three at large members of the executive committee (not including the graduate student representative) can reside in the same country during any two-year period.”

CFProposals: AHA 2016

The SHCY Outreach Committee is accepting proposals for possible sessions at the next American Historical Association conference (to be held in Atlanta, GA, Jan. 7-10, 2016). As an AHA Affiliate, SHCY is able to sponsor sessions at the organization’s annual conference. Affiliate-sponsored sessions convene at the regular conference venues and appear on the AHA program.​ We are especially interested in sponsoring sessions that examine the history of childhood and youth across a global landscape, sessions that address the state of the field, and sessions that focus on teaching the history of children and youth in both national and world survey courses. All proposed panelists need to be members of SHCY. Members of SHCY outside the United States are welcome to participate in SHCY-sponsored AHA sessions.

Please submit proposals by May 1, 2015 to Rebecca de Schweinitz at rld@byu.edu.

Call for Nominations: 2015 Grace Abbott Book Prize

The Society for the History of Children and Youth (SHCY) is pleased to call for nominations for the best book published in English on the history of children, childhood, or youth (broadly construed) published in 2014.

The award of a plaque and a check for $500 will be made by mid-summer 2015.

Nominations are invited from publishers, editors, scholars, and authors. Current members of the SHCY award committee, the executive committee, and officers of the society are ineligible. Nominations must be postmarked by April 15, 2015.

Send a copy of the book, physical or electronic (PDF only), for consideration to each of the book award committee members at the following addresses:

Ben Keppel (Chair)
Department of History
University of Oklahoma
455 West Lindsey Street, Suite 403A
Norman OK 73019
bkeppel@ou.edu

Kristine Alexander
Department of History
The University of Lethbridge
4401 University Drive
Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4
Canada
kristine.alexander@gmail.com

Luke Springman
Office of Global Education
Room 234, Student Services Center
Bloomsburg University
400 East Second Street
Bloomsburg, PA 17815-1301
lspringm@bloomu.edu

Call for Nominations: Fass-Sandin Prize for the best article (in English)

The Society for the History of Children and Youth (SHCY) is pleased to call for nominations for the best article in English on the history of children, childhood, or youth (broadly construed) published in 2014 in a print or online journal. The prize consists of a plaque and a check for $250. The winner will be announced no later than mid-summer.

Nominations are invited from publishers, editors, scholars, and authors. Current members of the SHCY award committee, the executive committee, and officers of the society are ineligible.

Send a PDF or photocopy of the article to James Marten at james.marten@marquette.edu. The deadline for nominations is April 15, 2014.

The committee is comprised of:

Simon Sleight (chair), King’s College, London

Corrie Decker, UC-Davis

Corinne Field, University of Virginia

Guest Post: Shurlee Swain on Networking, Interdisciplinarity, and the SHCY

Shurlee Swain is Professor in the Faculty of Education and the Arts and Australian Catholic University. A long-time and active member of the SHCY, her most recent book is The Market in Children: Stories of Australian Adoption (2013). She is guest editor of the forthcoming special issue of the JHCY.

Although the organizational history of children’s institutions has been well documented, there has been less space in the academic sphere for exploring the experience of those who grew up within their walls. The forthcoming issue of the Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth is a first step towards filling this gap.

The special issue brings together papers presented at the 2013 SHCY conference in Nottingham which shared an interest in the history of children in out-of-home care. At its core are a group of scholars whose work has been shaped by their involvement in the inquiries into institutional abuse that have taken place in many Western countries over the last two decades. In such inquiries it is the voice of the victim/survivor that is given precedence, a voice which often challenges the ways in which the history of institutional care has been written in the past. SHCY conferences have provided a valuable networking space for those who work in this area leading to the development of an International Network on Studies of Inquiries into Child Abuse, Politics of Apology and Historical Representations of Children in Out-of home Care which, with Swedish funding, is now able to hold meetings of its own.

In the special issue you will find papers by Johanna Sköld, founder of the Inquiry Network and a researcher on the Swedish national inquiry, Maria Rytter and Jacob Knage Rasmussen, who conducted the Danish inquiry, Kjersti Ericsson who has closely observed the inquiry and reparation process in Norway, and Shurlee Swain and Nell Musgrove who have worked on projects funded in the aftermath of similar inquiries in Australia. They are joined by Lieselot De Wilde and Bruno Vanobbergen whose study of the orphan houses in Ghent, Belgium, began independently from any national inquiry but has been profoundly influenced by the demands of former orphanage residents that their voices be heard. It is such voices that Kathleen Vongsathorn would like to be able to access in her article on the Kumi Children’s Leper Home in Uganda but in their absence she interrogates the surviving sources to identify the gaps and silences which hide the children’s experiences from view. The victim/survivor voice that emerges through inquiries is predominantly negative. In this context, the article by Birgitte Søland provides a useful corrective. Working in the United States, where no national inquiries have taken place, her interviews with former orphanage residents tap the positive memories which struggle to find a place where the focus is on past abuse.

The appearance of the special issue on the eve of the SHCY conference in Vancouver is timely, emphasizing the valuable networking opportunity that the conference provides. Several of the contributors will present papers at the conference so if you have an interest in the history of children in out of home care we look forward to meeting you there!

SHCY Outreach Grant: Child’s Play: Multi-Sensory Histories of Children and Childhood in Japan and Beyond

The SHCY is proud to be a co-sponsor of the interdisciplinary workshop CHILD’S PLAY: MULTI-SENSORY HISTORIES OF CHILDREN AND CHILDHOOD IN JAPAN AND BEYOND, to be held at the University of California, Santa Barbara, February 27-28, 2015. The workshop is partly funded by a SHCY Outreach Grant.
Workshop website: http://www.eastasian.ucsb.edu/projects/childs-play/.​

Call for Nominations: Fass-Sandin Prize for Best Article

The Society for the History of Children and Youth (SHCY) is pleased to call for nominations for the best article in Danish, Norwegian, or Swedish on the history of children, childhood, or youth (broadly construed) published in 2012, 2013, and 2014 in a print or online journal. The SHCY will grant two awards. The prizes consists of a plaque and a check for $250. The winners will be announced at the SHCY conference in Vancouver 2015. Authors will be informed of the award prior to the conference, and it will be announced on the website. Nominations are invited from publishers, editors, scholars, and authors. Eligibility for the awards is based solely on the language in which the article is published, not on the residence or nationality of the author. Current members of the SHCY award committee, the executive committee, and officers of the society are ineligible.

Send a PDF or photocopy of the article to the chair of the prize committee, Bengt Sandin at Bengt.Sandin@liu.se. The deadline for nominations is March 1st, 2015. The other members of the committee are Ning de Conink Smith, and Ellen Schrumpf.

Nominations for Fass-Sandin Prize for the best articles in French and German will be announced in 2016 and in Italian and Spanish in 2017; each award will cover the three previous years.​

2014 Outreach Grant Report: Legal History Consortium

On June 1-2, 2014 an SHCY Outreach Grant helped the Legal History Consortium hold a conference on conference “The Law and the Child in Historical Perspective” in Minneapolis at the University of Minnesota Law School. The conference was the fourth sponsored by the Consortium, which includes: the University of Minnesota Law School and History Department, Indiana University Maurer School of Law, University of Michigan Law School, University of Chicago Law School, University of Pennsylvania Law School and History Department, and University of Illinois Law School. It was established to nurture the work of beginning and early career (advanced graduate students and pre-tenure) scholars in the field of legal history, focusing each conference on a topic of special significance in the field of legal history.

This year’s conference focused on the legal history of children and youth. It attracted emerging scholars working in a broad range of fields geographically, chronologically, and topically. We could accept only 15 of the 57 submissions for the day and half conference. They were divided into five panels with three papers each. All participants read the papers and participated in the discussions; Consortium members served as commentators and discussion leaders. The results were terrific.

Continue reading “2014 Outreach Grant Report: Legal History Consortium”

Deadline Extended for SHCY2015 Proposals!

2015 Conference: CFP Society for the History of Children and Youth Eighth Biennial Conference

Date: June 24-26th, 2015
Location: University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

Proposal Submission Deadline: OCTOBER 15, 2014 (FINAL)

Description: “In Relation: Children, Youth, and Belonging”

The Program Committee invites proposals for panels, papers, roundtables or workshops that explore histories of children and youth from any place and in any era. We will, however, give particular attention to proposals with a strong historical emphasis and that bear on the theme of this year’s conference. Relationships are foundational to human lives and to children’s experience of the world. They might involve coercion and suffering, or agency and liberation. Domestic relationships with parents, caregivers, siblings, relatives, and pets shape young people’s sense of self, their experiences and their place in the world. Wider relationship circles, including those with peers and adult professionals such as teachers, doctors, police, and social workers, likewise affect young people’s position in the world in diverse ways. The complex effects of large-scale events and phenomena including colonization, imperialism, war, industrialization, urbanization, and disease epidemics, among others, have both direct and indirect effects on young peoples’ relationships that vary across time and cultural context. Virtual relationships facilitated by letter writing and, more recently, digital technology, provide young people with a distinctive window onto international connections and cross-cultural influences. Relations of power, often uneven and always nuanced by gender, race, class, sexuality, and (dis)ability, flow through all relationships that young people forge and encounter. Historical research that explores the varied meanings attached to the range of relationships young people experience usefully expands our understanding of both the past and present.

Continue reading “Deadline Extended for SHCY2015 Proposals!”

New Book: Children and Youth during the Gilded Age and Progressive Era

James Marten is Professor and Chair of the History Department at Marquette University. He is author or editor of more than a dozen books, including in this series Children in Colonial America; Children and Youth in a New Nation; and Children and Youth during the Civil War Era (all available from NYU Press).

Paula S. Fass is the Margaret Byrne Professor History at the University of California at Berkeley. She is the author of Kidnapped: Child Abduction in America, Outside In: Minorities and the Transformation of American Education, and The Damned and the Beautiful: American Youth in the 1920s. She is the editor of The Encyclopedia of Children and Childhood in History and Society and (with Mary Ann Mason) Childhood in America (available from NYU Press).

In the decades after the Civil War, urbanization, industrialization, and immigration marked the start of the Gilded Age, a period of rapid economic growth but also social upheaval. Reformers responded to the social and economic chaos with a “search for order,” as famously described by historian Robert Wiebe. Most reformers agreed that one of the nation’s top priorities should be its children and youth, who, they believed, suffered more from the disorder plaguing the rapidly growing nation than any other group.

Children and Youth during the Gilded Age and Progressive Era explores both nineteenth century conditions that led Progressives to their search for order and some of the solutions applied to children and youth in the context of that search. Edited by renowned scholar of children’s history James Marten, the collection of eleven essays offers case studies relevant to educational reform, child labor laws, underage marriage, and recreation for children, among others. Including important primary documents produced by children themselves, the essays in this volume foreground the role that youth played in exerting agency over their own lives and in contesting the policies that sought to protect and control them.

2014 Outreach Grant Report: Working Group on Children

On June 4, 2014, an SHCY Outreach Grant helped the Working Group on Children at the University of California, Santa Cruz bring Mary Niall Mitchell, Joseph Tregle Professor in Early American History, Ethel and Herman Midlo Chair in New Orleans Studies, and Associate Professor at the University of New Orleans, to present her current project exploring children, photography, and the politics of abolition in the nineteenth century United States. Mitchell, author of Raising Freedom’s Child: Black Children and Visions of the Future after Slavery (New York University Press, 2010), presented “The Slave Girl in the Archive: A Tale of Paper and Glass,” a talk drawing on her current research. Mitchell’s project tells the story of a girl named Mary Botts, the first light-skinned formerly enslaved child to be photographed for abolitionist purposes. Beginning with the deposit of the child’s daguerreotype portrait at the Massachusetts Historical Society in 1921, Mitchell unspools the history of Mary’s family and their long efforts to be free from slavery. “The Slave Girl in the Archive” uses this narrative to explore connections between the lives of enslaved people and the variety of documents and artifacts that contain traces of them. The talk attracted a lively audience of about thirty-five people, drawing faculty and graduate students from across disciplines, including History, Literature, Politics, and Philosophy to the campus’s weekly Cultural Studies Colloquium.

In addition to the talk, Prof. Mitchell led a workshop directly addressing the possibilities and challenges of writing the history of children. The workshop, entitled “Archival Challenges: Children, Slavery and Nineteenth Century Visual Culture,” included a discussion of pre-circulated readings, including selections from Robin Bernstein’s Racial Innocence: Performing American Childhood from Slavery to Civil Rights (New York University Press, 2011), Mary Langdon’s Ida May: A Story of Things Actual and Possible (London, 1854), Alan Trachtenberg, “Reading Lessons: Stories of a Daguerreotype,” Nineteenth Century Contexts 22 (2001), 537-557, and Mitchell’s recent piece in the New York Times’ Disunion blog, “The Young White Faces of Slavery,” January 30, 2014. The workshop was attended by a mixture of faculty and graduate student participants in the Working Group on Children. The conversation ranged widely but was particularly focused on the value of fiction in attempting to reconstruct the historical values attached to childhood, as well as the importance of historical investigation to illuminate the distance between sentimental representations and children’s historical lives. The Institute for Humanities Research at the University of California, Santa Cruz also provided support for both events.

For more information on the event, including audio of the talk, please visit this website:
http://ihr.ucsc.edu/portfolio/mary-niall-mitchell-workshop-archival-challenges-children-slavery-and-nineteenth-century-visual-culture/

SHCY OUTREACH GRANTS 2015

The Society for the History of Children and Youth will award two $500 grants for events that take place in 2015 to projects deemed worthy by the Outreach and Executive Committees of the SHCY.

$500 grants will help defray expenses for speakers, workshops, and other scholarly events fully or partially devoted to the history of children and youth. Funded events cannot conflict with the SHCY’s 8th Biennial Conference (June 24-26, 2015 in Vancouver, British Columbia).

Possible uses:
•Keynote speakers or panelists
•Receptions
•Printed materials
•Publicity
•Support for students attending the event

Application deadline: November 1, 2014.

Terms of the grants:
•Applicants must be members of SHCY. (See http://shcyhome.org/membership/ for membership information.)
•Recipients of 2013 and 2014 Outreach Grants cannot receive 2015 grants, and no one may apply for more than one 2015 grant.
•Funds will be distributed directly to host departments or institutions prior to the event.
•SHCY must be acknowledged as co-sponsor on all print and web-based materials and announcements, and, when appropriate, in speaker introductions. When possible, use the SHCY logo and link to the SHCY website.
•SHCY must be sent PDF’s or links to announcements and promotional materials before the event.
•A report must be submitted to the chairs of the Outreach Committee no later than thirty days after the funded event. It should consist of the following:
—Blog post describing the event for use on the SHCY website
—Summary of the attendance (size, makeup)
—Copy of appropriate printed materials or screenshots of websites
—Description of the actual expenses covered by the grant

Note: If the event funded by the grant is part of a larger conference or other function, the funded portion of the conference must be identified as discrete portions of the program and labeled as co-sponsored by SHCY.

One-page applications should be submitted as PDF files via email to the Outreach Committee co-chairs Rebecca de Schweinitz and Luke Springman. They should include:
—Date, location, and primary sponsor of event
—Description of audience (size, makeup)
—Total cost of event and other confirmed or potential funding sources
—Description of event that articulates how it contributes to all or part of SHCY’s mission: promoting the history of children and youth by supporting research about childhood, youth cultures, and the experience of young people across diverse times and places; fostering study across disciplinary and methodological boundaries; providing venues for scholars to communicate with one another; and promoting excellence in scholarship.

*Note: The Committee may request additional information from applicants about their event and about the participants and intended audience.

The Outreach Committee will recommend awardees to the SHCY Executive Committee, which will make final decisions. Recipients of grants will be announced by December 12, 2014.

Outreach Grant Report: Twenty Years a-Growing Conference

Twenty years a-Growing: Conference Report

On the 9th and 10th of June, St Patrick’s College, Drumcondra, Dublin, hosted ‘Twenty years a-Growing: an international conference on the history of Irish childhood from the medieval to the modern age.’ This conference was the first of its kind in Ireland and explored various historical narratives of Irish childhood. Over fifty speakers participated in this highly successful conference, with speakers travelling from Canada, Israel, and the UK, as well as from Irish institutions. Papers were delivered in both the English and Irish languages.

The participants came from a variety of disciplines and the topics presented included cultural, literary, educational, social, and institutional history, along with the history of Irish childhood in the transnational context. Dr Lindsey Earner-Byrne (University College Dublin) delivered the first keynote address and provided an historiographical overview of Irish childhood to date. Leading expert on the history of childhood, Professor Hugh Cunningham (University of Kent) dealt with the dominant narratives of childhood and the extent to which these narratives reflect the reality of children’s lives past and present. Professor Pat Dolan (NUI Galway) emphasized the importance of family histories in our understanding of childhood in the past, and the final plenary speaker, Professor Declan Kiberd (University of Notre Dame) addressed the archaic and avant-garde nature of childhood in the literature of major Irish authors from Swift and Wilde to Yeats and Joyce.

Building on the success of this conference, a History of Irish Childhood Research Network has been established to facilitate future collaborative research on the history of Irish childhood. Further information is available at http://irishchildhood.wordpress.com The conference committee is also building up a bibliography of archival sources on the history of Irish childhood, which will soon be available on the internet.

The conference committee would like to acknowledge the financial support provided by the Society for the History of Childhood and Youth in the form of an outreach grant.

Conference Committee: Gaye Ashford, Marnie Hay, Ríona Nic Congáil (St Patrick’s College, Drumcondra), Sarah-Anne Buckley (National University of Ireland, Galway), Mary Hatfield (Trinity College Dublin), Jutta Kruse (University of Limerick).

Nicholas L. Syrett wins Fass-Sandin Prize

Robin Bernstein (committee chair), Melissa Klapper, and Pamela Riney-Kehrberg unanimously selected Nicholas L. Syrett’s article, “‘I did and I Don’t Regret It’: Child Marriage and the Contestation of Childhood in the United States,” to receive the Fass-Sandin Prize for the best article (in English) on the History of Children and Youth published in 2013. Twenty articles were submitted for the committee’s consideration.

Syrett’s essay, published in the Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth (vol. 6, Spring 2013), uses an exceptionally rich and multi-dimensional field of evidence, including legal cases, archival newspapers, and census data, to argue that at the turn of the twentieth century, some minors used early marriage as a way to gain agency over their own lives and in some cases to contest the state of childhood itself. This is an original, counter-intuitive argument that challenges the received dogma that child marriage is by definition exclusively oppressive to youth. The Prize Committee particularly admired the way that Syrett used legal evidence to unearth youths’ perspectives on—and manipulations of—the law. Syrett’s essay is a significant and unforgettable work of scholarship. Syrett is an associate professor of history at the University of Northern Colorado.

Continue reading “Nicholas L. Syrett wins Fass-Sandin Prize”

SHCY Sponsored Sessions at AHA 2015

The Society for the History of Children and Youth Outreach Committee is soliciting proposals from SHCY members who would like to participate in a single-sponsored session at the American Historical Association Annual Conference, to be held in New York City, January 2-5, 2015. We are interested in possibly putting together two sessions. One would be a “state-of-the-field” session, and the other would focus on teaching the history of children and youth, and/or integrating children’s history into survey, methods, and education classes.

Please send a brief (500 words or less) proposal for your contribution to one of these panels, along with a one-page CV to Rebecca de Schweinitz (rld@byu.edu) by May 2, 2014. (Single-sponsored sessions appear on the regular AHA program and are held at the conference venue. Members who will be participating in other sessions at AHA are not eligible.)

SHCY 2014 Outreach Grants

SHCY is pleased to announce that the following Outreach Grants have been awarded for 2014:

$500 Grants
Catherine Jones (University of California, Santa Cruz)
“The Slave Girl in the Archive: A Tale on Paper and Glass,” workshop and talk by Mary Niall Mitchell (University of New Orleans), June 4, 2014, UC Santa Cruz.

Mary Hatfield (Trinity College, Dublin) and Riona Nic Congail (St. Patrick’s College, Drumcondra)
“Twenty Years A-Growing: An International Conference on the History of Irish Childhood from the Medieval to the Modern Age,” June 9-10, 2014, Dublin City University.
Conference Website: http://irishchildhood.wordpress.com

$1500 Grant
Michael Grossberg (Indiana University) and Barbara Young Welke (University of Minnesota)
“The Law and the Child in Historical Perspective,” June 1-2, University of Minnesota.
Conference Website: http://gooch010.wix.com/law-child-conference

Call for Nominations: Grace Abbott Book Award

The Society for the History of Children and Youth (SHCY) is pleased to call for nominations for the best book published in English on the history of children, childhood, or youth (broadly construed) published in 2013. The award consists of a plaque and a check for $500. The winner will be announced in mid-summer.

Nominations are invited from publishers, editors, scholars, and self-nominations by authors. Current members of the SHCY award committee, the executive committee, and officers of the society are ineligible.

Nominations must be postmarked by April 30, 2014. Send a copy of the book, physical or electronic, to each of the book award committee members at the following addresses:

E. Wayne Carp (Chair)
Pacific Lutheran University
Department of History
12180 Park Ave. South
Tacoma WA 98447-0003
carpw@plu.edu

Ishita Pande
Department of History
49 Bader Lane
Watson Hall, Room 212
Queen’s University
Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
pande@queensu.ca

Steven Mintz
Executive Director, Institute for Transformational Learning
414 O. Henry Hall
601 Colorado St.
Austin, TX 78701
steven.mintz@outlook.com

Call for Nominations: Fass-Sandin Prize for Best Article

Call for Nominations: Fass-Sandin Prize for the best article (in English) on the History of Children and Youth published in 2013.

The Society for the History of Children and Youth (SHCY) is pleased to call for nominations for the best article in English on the history of children, childhood, or youth (broadly construed) published in 2013 in a print or online journal. The prize consists of a plaque and a check for $250. The winner will be announced in mid-summer. The Fass-Sandin awards for articles published in Norwegian, Swedish, and Danish will be announced separately.

Nominations are invited from publishers, editors, scholars, and authors. Current members of the SHCY award committee, the executive committee, and officers of the society are ineligible.

Send a PDF or photocopy of the article to the chair of the prize committee, Robin Bernstein, at rbernst@fas.harvard.edu. The deadline for nominations is April 15, 2014. The other members of the committee are Melissa Klapper and Pamela Riney-Kehberg.

SHCY Executive Committee Expands Best Article Award

The SHCY Executive Committee has unanimously voted to name the Society’s Best Article Award the Fass-Sandin Prize. Three awards will be given each year; one for an article published in English and two for articles published in languages other than English (see more below). The awards will consist of a plaque and $250. Winners will be announced each summer on the SHCY website and will also be recognized at the next SHCY conference banquet.

The expansion of the award to include articles published in languages other than English reflects the Society’s continuing interest in reflecting the global reach of the field. Naming the award after past presidents Paula Fass and Bengt Sandin recognizes their role in creating the Society and in developing its international focus and identity.

Look for the calls for nominations on this website, on H-Net, and in emails from Secretary-Treasurer Kriste Lindenmeyer.

The awards for articles published in languages other than English will follow a three-year cycle:

In 2014, two awards will be offered for articles in the three Scandinavian languages published in 2011, 2012, and 2013.

In 2015, the awards will be offered for articles in French and German published in 2012, 2013, 2014.

In 2016, the awards will be offered for articles in Italian and Spanish published in 2013, 2014, and 2015.

The cycle will begin again in 2017. Eligibility is based solely on the language in which the article is published, not on the residence or nationality of the author.

SHCY Co-Sponsorship for AHA

Call for 2015 AHA proposals for SCHY Co-sponsorship

The Outreach Committee of the Society for the History of Children and Youth is soliciting panel proposals that focus on the history of children and youth for the 2015 American Historical Association Annual Meeting (Jan. 2-5, 2015 in New York City) for possible co-sponsorship.

Submit full panel proposals to Outreach co-chair, Rebecca de Schweinitz at rld@byu.edu no later than Wednesday Feb. 5, 2014. Panel organizers will be notified by Feb. 11th of the committee’s decisions. If accepted for co-sponsorship, organizers will be given instructions on submitting their proposal as a co-sponsored panel.

All members of co-sponsored panels must be current members of SHCY. Membership information can be found here.

SHCY may decide to single-sponsor panels approved for co-sponsorship but not accepted by the AHA program committee.

AHA call for proposals: http://www.historians.org/annual-meeting/submit-a-proposal

SHCY Panels at the American Historical Association

Are you headed to the AHA in Washington D.C. in the new year? If so, be sure to check out SHCY co-sponsored sessions at AHA:

Please also note these other panels which may be of interest (or include papers of interest) to SHCY members:
Session10448
Session9779
Session10205
Session10456
Session10671
Session10535
Session10056
Session9772
Session10344
Session9790
Session9857
Session9821
Session9760
Session10029

Guest Post: Helle Strandgaard Jensen on Kermit’s Chubby Danish Cousin

Helle Strandgaard Jensen recently graduated from the European University Institute in Florence, Italy with her PhD entitled Defining the (In)appropriate: Scandinavian debates about the role of media in children’s lives, 1950-1985. She has written a number of articles on the history of children’s media and the epistemological failures of ‘moral panic’ theory. She starts as assistant professor of Film- and Media Studies at University of Copenhagen 1 February 2014.

At the small and narrow desks in the old buildings of the Danish National Archives, it is virtually impossible to avoid peeking at your neighbors’ documents. In this way I discovered that, unlike me, most of the archives’ users come there to study their own ancestry. Personally, family history never excited me much until recently when I discovered a very peculiar kinship relation between two TV-star hand-puppets!

What I found as I went through the archive’s documents was evidence that a very popular Danish TV hand-puppet, a little chubby frog named Kaj, was made with direct inspiration from Sesame Street’s Kermit. At first I just thought it a funny fact. Lately, however, my mind keeps returning to the kinship between the two frogs and the story it relates of transnational transfers, and the tension between globally-marketed children’s media and local demands of enculturation.

Continue reading “Guest Post: Helle Strandgaard Jensen on Kermit’s Chubby Danish Cousin”

Guest Post: Nicholas L. Syrett on the History of Minors and Marriage in the United States

Nicholas L. Syrett is associate professor of history at the University of Northern Colorado and the author of The Company He Keeps: A History of White College Fraternities. He is writing a book on the history of minors and marriage in the United States and, with Corinne T. Field, coediting a volume on the significance of chronological age in American history to be published by NYU Press.

Writing the history of young people marrying in the United States, especially from a legal perspective, has largely meant focusing on the beginnings of marriages, and occasionally on their first year, during which time parents, married children, and various government officials and judges wrangled over their validity.  Indeed the article that I published in the JHCY focuses on the moment that legal minors married and how those marriages contested their status as children.  None of this, however, tells us all that much about how these youthful marriages actually turned out.  The fate of their marriages was, however, the focus of marriage and divorce reformers of the late nineteenth century, social workers of the early twentieth, and many social scientists of the mid-twentieth century.  And while the statistics became more reliable the further we get into the twentieth century, about one thing almost all of these groups agreed: youthful marriages were much more likely to end in divorce.

Continue reading “Guest Post: Nicholas L. Syrett on the History of Minors and Marriage in the United States”

Guest Post: Jill E. Anderson on Anne Emery’s Fictional Teen Heroine Dinny Gordon

Jill E. Anderson is the History, African-American Studies, and Women’s Studies Librarian at Georgia State University; she holds a PhD in US cultural and women’s/gender history from Rutgers University and an MSIS from the University of Texas at Austin. Her current project is on post-World War II girls’ intellectual culture, and she is blogging on this project at True Stories Backwards.

In my forthcoming Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth article, “Dinny Gordon, Intellectual: Anne Emery’s Postwar Junior Fiction and Girls’ Intellectual Culture,” I focus on popular novelist Anne Emery’s fictional teen heroine Dinny Gordon, an unusually bookish heroine for this genre.

DinnyGordonFreshmanDinny is consistently portrayed as a serious, engaged reader. Inspired to plan an archaeological tour abroad after reading a book on Pompeii while babysitting, she also creates an award-winning geology project on Pompeii. She finds her sister’s teen-oriented books frustrating, preferring instead to settle into Edward Gibbon’s Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. And in Sophomore, she falls asleep having finished Mary Renault’s novel on Theseus, The King Must Die, a birthday gift from her history-professor father. Prof. Gordon wakes Dinny to introduce her to his teaching assistant, Brad Kenyon, a graduate student in ancient history at the University of Chicago. Brad and Dinny develop a strongly intellectual relationship: he introduces her to the Oriental Institute and to a prominent Israeli archaeologist, and helps her secure a summer apprenticeship with the archaeologist. A serious-minded girl, Dinny refuses to date boys she doesn’t find interesting, holding out for both emotional and intellectual connection. It’s implied that she will find this with Brad, though she dates several other young men first.

Continue reading “Guest Post: Jill E. Anderson on Anne Emery’s Fictional Teen Heroine Dinny Gordon”

SHCY Outreach Grants 2014

The SHCY will award two $500 grants and one $1500 grant for events that take place in 2014 to projects deemed worthy by the Outreach and Executive Committees of the SHCY.

1. The $500 grants will help defray expenses for speakers, workshops, and other scholarly events fully or partially devoted to the history of children and youth.

Possible uses:
•Keynote speakers or panelists
•Receptions
•Printed materials
•Publicity
•Support for students attending the event

2. The $1500 grant will help offset the costs of a regional conference dedicated to the history of children and youth and held in 2014. The Society is particularly interested in supporting programs that address the the histories of children and youth in interdisciplinary and transnational ways.

Application deadline for both grants: November 15, 2013.

Continue reading “SHCY Outreach Grants 2014”

Guest Post: Joy Schulz on Mining for Treasures

Joy Schulz, is a member of the History Faculty at Metropolitan Community College in Omaha, Nebraska. She is the recipient of a 2013-15 AHA “Bridging Cultures” grant, studying Atlantic and Pacific influences on U.S. history. Below she talks about her research for a Spring 2013 article in JHCY, and a forthcoming article on the missionary children in Hawai‘i to appear in Diplomatic History (Oxford University Press).

In researching my article on the white children of American missionaries to the Hawaiian kingdom during the nineteenth century, I had the pleasure to travel to the islands for archival research. Some of my colleagues suggested that I chose my topic for that very reason! While the islands are always beautiful, travel to them is expensive, and my time was limited. From a very practical standpoint, my research at Punahou and the Hawaiian Missions Children Society archives took on an extremely frantic pace as I attempted to gather as many documents as I could in a short amount of time. I pass on to my fellow researchers one method that worked well for me.

Punahou Punahou 2

Continue reading “Guest Post: Joy Schulz on Mining for Treasures”

Guest Post: Adam Golub on Teaching Childhood Through Myth and Counter-Memory

Adam Golub is an associate professor of American Studies at California State University, Fullerton. His syllabus for AMST 420, “Childhood and Family in American Culture,” can be found on his faculty web page.

This semester marks the fourth time I will teach an upper-division American Studies elective called “Childhood and Family in American Culture.” One of my main goals in teaching the course is to help students engage critically with the deep nostalgia and powerful mythology that surrounds childhood in the United States. I want students to reflect on the ways in which the sentimental stories we tell ourselves about childhood—stories of innocence, happiness, comfort, and coming-of-age—tend to obscure the diverse experiences of actual children. One way I teach this disconnect between myth and experience is to start the course by pairing two childhood narratives: one that reinforces the American mythology of childhood, and one that exposes the margins and silences in that mythology.

Continue reading “Guest Post: Adam Golub on Teaching Childhood Through Myth and Counter-Memory”

Interview with Colin Heywood (Univ. of Nottingham)

Colin Heywood on the recent SHCY conference at the University of Nottingham – June, 2013

Professor Colin Heywood of the University of Nottingham is the author of four books, two of which are particularly important for the history of childhood: A History of Childhood: Children and Childhood in the West from Medieval to Modern Times (Polity, 2001); Growing up in France: from the Ancien Régime to the Third Republic (Cambridge Univ. Press, 2007). He served SHCY as host for the 2013 conference in June. On July 22, Patrick Ryan of Kings University College in London, Ontario recorded this interviewed with Professor Heywood about his reflections upon the conference, and for his thoughts about the state of historical research about childhood.

Prof. Heywood Podcast

Guest Post: John E. Murray on Mary Grainger and the Charleston Orphan House

SHCY member John E. Murray, J. R. Hyde III Professor of Political Economy, shares this biographical sketch of Mary Grainger, one of the rich stories from the Orphan House records that informed his latest book, The Charleston Orphan House.

The Charleston Orphan House was the first public orphanage in America, founded by ordinance of the city council in October 1790. Several thousand children passed through its doors and the organization continues as a child welfare agency to the present. Throughout childhood, a variety of documents by and about particular children accumulated—some written by parents or guardians, some by masters, and some by Orphan House officials—and are now safely held in the Charleston County Public Library.

These records yield hundreds of biographical sketches of rather ordinary children. As a potential source of historical evidence about young members of the working class, roughly between the Revolution and the Civil War, I believe this collection is unsurpassed. It is possible that other child welfare archives hold similar riches, at least for the Early Republic period. As an example from the Orphan House records, I describe a bit of the young life of one girl, Mary Grainger, whose story does not appear in my recent book, The Charleston Orphan House (University of Chicago Press, 2013).

Continue reading “Guest Post: John E. Murray on Mary Grainger and the Charleston Orphan House”

Podcast: Writing the History of Childhood and Youth in Canada

Here is the audio recording of the HCYG roundtable at the University of Victoria in June 2013: Unraveling Common and Uncommon Threads: Writing the History of Childhood and Youth in Canada / Dénouer les dénominateurs communs et moins communs: Écrire l’histoire de l’enfance et de la jeunesse au Canada.

Listen Here

Speakers:
1. Cynthia Comacchio, Wilfrid Laurier “Chronology, Biology and History: Why Age Matters.” (0:00-12:19)

2. Mona Gleason, UBC: “Beyond the Fetish of ‘Voice’: Theoretical and Methodological Innovation in the History of Children in Canada.” (12:20-27:02)

3. Dominique Marshall, Carleton: “L’action politique des enfants canadiens: Dimensions transnationales, découvertes et suggestions.” (27:03-43:33).

4. Jonathan Anuik, Alberta: “The Futility of the Hypothetical in Canadian Childhood and Youth: Practical Considerations from Education.” (43:34-1:00)

Guest Post: Mona Gleason and the Limits of “Children’s Voices”

Observations on the Limits of “Children’s Voices”
Mona Gleason, Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia

Small Matters cover

Perhaps the one concern that binds historians of children and youth together, regardless of national context, time frame, or thematic interest, is the search for “children’s voices” in the past. Recovering and highlighting the perspectives of young people in our histories distinguishes our field from others. Many papers at SHCY conferences, published journal articles, and books in the field are devoted to finding and underscoring the child’s voice, often used as a short hand for a commitment to uncovering their “agency.” Having just completed a book entitled Small Matters: Canadian Children in Sickness and Health, 1900 to 1940, I’ve struggled quite intimately with what it means to include and highlight the “child’s voice.” After all, the perspectives of young people on this complex and multilayered history, I argue in the book, is the very thing missing in much of the Canadian historiography on health and medicine, generally, and health and childhood, in particular. My book relies heavily on the oral histories of a wide range of adults who grew up in Canada over the early to mid-twentieth century. It was critical to me that the oral histories about health experiences formed the backbone of the book. This would, I believed, literally “give voice,” however imperfect and mediated, to young people thereby establishing their agency as historical actors. It was not that simple. My attempts to “write children into” this history by including their “voices” in my analysis, brought to the surface a number of theoretical and methodological caveats that are particularly applicable to the Canadian historiography, but that also have relevance writ large. I briefly outline only two of these caveats below – there are others, but I’ll limit myself to these for this brief post.

Continue reading “Guest Post: Mona Gleason and the Limits of “Children’s Voices””

2013 SHCY General Election Results

Here are the results from the recent General Election:

Vice President/President Elect:

Mona Gleason
University of British Columbia

At Large Executive Committee Members:

Tamara Myers
University of British Columbia

Dirk Schumann
University of Göttingen, Germany

Johanna Sköld
Linköping University, Sweden

Graduate Student Representative:

Susan Eckelmann
Indiana University

Thank you to everyone who voted and congratulations to the incoming SHCY officers!

SHCY 2013: Graduate Student Digest

Susan Eckelmann, the Graduate Student Representative for SHCY, provides this recap of the executive meeting and ideas for expanding opportunities for graduate students below.

The job market, writing a dissertation, and funding dissertation research can be challenging and produce frustrating moments at times. But to most of us, this is hardly any news. As SHCY’s graduate student representative, I’m committed to developing professional workshops, creating more funding opportunities, promoting more awards for graduate students, and expanding pedagogical resources on SCHY’s website, among other important developments necessary to succeed as a budding scholar.

During this year’s executive meeting, I have raised and pushed for a number of important changes that I hope will further professional development, increase the visibility of grad students’ intellectual contributions, and cultivate institutional and funding support for dissertation research and conference participation.

Continue reading “SHCY 2013: Graduate Student Digest”

2013 Best Article Award: Ishita Pande

The Best Article Award Committee for the Society for the History of Children and Youth for 2013 was composed of three members: Barbara Beatty (Wellesley College); Julia Grant (James Madison College at Michigan State University); and Marie Nelson Clark (Linkoping University).

The committee chose Ishita Pande’s “Coming of Age: Law, sex, and Childhood in Late Colonial India,” Gender & History vol. 24, no. 1 (April 2012) to receive the 2013 Best Article award.

Continue reading “2013 Best Article Award: Ishita Pande”

2013 Grace Abbott Best Book Award Winner: Robin Bernstein

The Grace Abbott Best Book Award Committee of the Society for the History of Children and Youth for 2013 was composed of four members: Daniel Cook (Rutgers University, Camden), Stephen Lassonde (Harvard University) Leslie Paris (University of British Columbia), Johanna Sköld (Linköping University).

The committee chose Robin Bernstein’s book Racial Innocence: Performing American Childhood from Slavery to Civil Rights (New York University Press, 2011) as the Grace Abbott Best Book Award winner.

Continue reading “2013 Grace Abbott Best Book Award Winner: Robin Bernstein”

SHCY 2013 recap: Interior/Exterior Spaces for Play

Annmarie Valdes, 3rd year PhD Student at Loyola University recaps Session 20 on Day 2 of the conference. This session dealt with interior and exterior spaces for play and recreation, 1600-1950.

I would like to begin this post on a short personal note: My initial attraction to this panel occurred in part because I spent the first decade of motherhood in, near or cleaning up after countless trips to the sandbox (along with the toys that they wanted to bring to the sandbox). On lazier days I allowed a space in the backyard for a “mud hole”. Even now I consider time spent in that particular “space,” the sandbox, invaluable—both for me and my children. The construction and destruction of worlds built with sand and mud—for me form part of the definition of play. During this time my thought about the sandbox and the mud hole was simple: children need a proper place (or space) to play. Simple? Maybe? And alongside this a couple of reminders 1) that historians need to be careful about interpreting play, as it is such a subjective activity and that what play is or means to and for children and adults if often different—adult research from an adult point of view and 2) when one has a personal interest and experience in a topic, how does one go about maintaining objectivity and 3) how can historians resolve the need for accounts from a child’s point of view?

Continue reading “SHCY 2013 recap: Interior/Exterior Spaces for Play”

SHCY 2013: Plenary Session

Annmarie Valdes, 3rd year PhD Student at Loyola University recaps the Plenary Session on Day 1 of the conference. This session dealt with the ideas of spaces of childhood.

Plenary June 25, 2013: The Spaces of Childhood: A conversation on rooms as evidence

First I would say that a small blog post cannot fully address the many conversations this plenary will no doubt inspire—including conversations that will occur after the conference.

The presenters of this Plenary each gave a small talk on four key spaces of Childhood: the Library, Museum, School and Orphanage. Each of these spaces included a contextualized account of the arrangement of the space, both as physical space and how this space was a reflection of the cultural, social and economic reality of the world that each of these spaces were conceptualized and used. Although the presenters are careful to distinguish that how spaces are used may not follow the original intention of the space, as it was intended by architects/builders. They also underscore the interplay of power by local and/or regional actors in different regions that these spaces were found. How a particular community or particular individuals appropriate space is an interesting question and can be addressed in part by these micro-histories about space.

Continue reading “SHCY 2013: Plenary Session”

SHCY 2013 recap: Spaces of Integration and Education

Annmarie Valdes, 3rd year PhD Student at Loyola University provides this summary of Session 3 on Spaces of Integration and Education

First Presenter: Francoise Hamlin

Anne Moody and her book Coming of Age in Mississippi. Ms. Hamlin presents an overview of Moody’s life and the personal conflicts about her own activism in her life. Specifically Ms. Hamlin situates Moody and her inner conflicts within the Civil Rights movement. The presenter gave a good account of her fame and her downward spiral—from activism and authorship—then the mental price she paid for her Civil Rights activism, but her trauma from Jim Crow was never repaired. By using the lens of trauma—one gains a nuanced understanding of the personal cost of the Civil Rights movement.

Continue reading “SHCY 2013 recap: Spaces of Integration and Education”

Podcast: James Marten on SHCY and JHCY

Earlier this month James Marten, the new editor of the JHCY, spoke with Brian Shea, Public Relations and Advertising Coordinator for the journal division at Johns Hopkins University Press, about his new role and the challenges facing journals and associations. The full podcast is available here and below is the transcript of the interview.

Shea: Thank you for joining me today Jim. How excited are you to begin your term as editor of the journal?

Marten: Well I kind of want to get started and figure out the system. It’s a new kind of technology for me. Everything is done online, and while I’ve done lots of editing of anthologies and other things, this is a very different process and so I kind of want to get into the first issue or two and learn how to do it. So, yeah, I’m very excited. Personally it’s a challenge because it’s a new sort of thing, but also it’s a great service to the society so I’m quite excited.

Continue reading “Podcast: James Marten on SHCY and JHCY”

Guest Post: Simon Sleight on Thomas Kennington’s Homeless

Recently we asked SHCY member Dr Simon Sleight (King’s College London) to reflect on a source that he had found especially compelling in the writing of his new book, Young People and the Shaping of Public Space in Melbourne, 1870–1914 (Ashgate). Here Simon offers his thoughts on a painting, which you can see either here or on the walls of Bendigo Art Gallery in Australia.

Thomas Kennington, Homeless, 1890
Thomas Kennington, Homeless, 1890

Homeless, helpless, a passive victim of the urban environment—this is a dominant image of youth at large in the late-Victorian city. Raised up from wet paving stones by a compassionate passer-by, this fallen child appears feeble, an object for pity and necessary rescue. The portrait’s tone is elegiac: the female figure is dressed in “widow’s weeds,” the garments of mourning, and the child’s limp posture and vacant gaze suggest that death may be near at hand. In the distance the grey gasworks, belching chimney and diagonal crane frame the location as industrial. Nature is a sparse commodity here; even the solitary tree in the painting is leafless, its lower branch snapped, its stone casing restricting room for future development. Nothing, we are invited to infer, can grow normally in this setting. No visual clue is given by the artist regarding the precise whereabouts of these characters. It could be any street in any industrial city of the Victorian era.

Continue reading “Guest Post: Simon Sleight on Thomas Kennington’s Homeless”

New Book: Young People and the Shaping of Public Space in Melbourne, 1870-1914

From SHCY member Simon Sleight (King’s College London): Young People and the Shaping of Public Space in Melbourne, 1870-1914. Ashgate Studies in Childhood, 2013.

From the publisher:
Baby booms have a long history. In 1870, colonial Melbourne was “perspiring juvenile humanity” with an astonishing 42 per cent of the city’s inhabitants aged 14 and under—a demographic anomaly resulting from the gold rushes of the 1850s. Within this context, Simon Sleight enters the heated debate concerning the future prospects of “Young Australia” and the place of the colonial child within the incipient Australian nation. Looking beyond those institutional sites so often assessed by historians of childhood, he ranges across the outdoor city to chart the relationship between a discourse about youth, youthful experience and the shaping of new urban spaces. Play, street work, consumerism, courtship, gang-related activities and public parades are examined using a plethora of historical sources to reveal a hitherto hidden layer of city life. Capturing the voices of young people as well as those of their parents, Sleight alerts us to the ways in which young people shaped the emergent metropolis by appropriating space and attempting to impress upon the city their own desires. Here a dynamic youth culture flourished well before the discovery of the “teenager” in the mid-twentieth century; here young people and the city grew up together.

Review:
“‘Marvellous Melbourne’, a precocious new world city of the late nineteenth century, is the site for this rich and acute study of how young people carved out their own spaces in the urban outdoors. Simon Sleight draws on a remarkable range of sources to illuminate the subversive perspectives of Melbourne’s youth. The book contributes to the burgeoning international scholarship on young people’s historical experiences, and is recommended reading for historians, geographers and sociologists alike.”—Stuart Macintyre, University of Melbourne, Australia

For more information, see the Ashgate website: http://www.ashgate.com/default.aspx?page=637&title_id=&edition_id=11456&calcTitle=1.

Call for Guest Bloggers: SHCY Conference 2013

SHCY is looking for guest bloggers to write about their experiences at the biennial conference in June. Scholars and graduate students are invited to submit their views/takeaways about a particular panel, a series of panels, or a session discussion—anything that may be of special interest to the community. Selected submissions would be no more than 500-1000 words, and would be featured on the association website shcyhome.org.

For more information or to volunteer, please email us at info@shcy.localhost

New Book: The Charleston Orphan House

From SHCY member John E. Murray: The Charleston Orphan House: Children’s Lives in the First Public Orphanage in America. University of Chicago Press, 2013.

From the publisher:
The first public orphanage in America, the Charleston Orphan House saw to the welfare and education of thousands of children from poor white families in the urban South. From wealthy benefactors to the families who sought its assistance to the artisans and merchants who relied on its charges as apprentices, the Orphan House was a critical component of the city’s social fabric. By bringing together white citizens from all levels of society, it also played a powerful political role in maintaining the prevailing social order.

John E. Murray tells the story of the Charleston Orphan House for the first time through the words of those who lived there or had family members who did. Through their letters and petitions, the book follows the families from the events and decisions that led them to the Charleston Orphan House through the children’s time spent there to, in a few cases, their later adult lives. What these accounts reveal are families struggling to maintain ties after catastrophic loss and to preserve bonds with children who no longer lived under their roofs.

An intimate glimpse into the lives of the white poor in early American history, The Charleston Orphan House is moreover an illuminating look at social welfare provision in the antebellum South.

For more information, see the University of Chicago Press website.

Member News: Children, Adults, and Shared Responsibilities

Children, Adults, and Shared Responsibilities: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Perspectives, Cambridge University Press, November 2012.

The book is a collection of essays by Jewish, Christian, and Muslim scholars that underscores the significance of sustained and serious ethical, inter-religious, and inter-disciplinary reflection on children.

Continue reading “Member News: Children, Adults, and Shared Responsibilities”

Member News: Ballots, Babies, and Banners of Peace

Melissa R. Klapper’s Ballots, Babies, and Banners of Peace: American Jewish Women’s Activism, 1890-1940 explores the social and political activism of American Jewish women from approximately 1890 to the beginnings of World War II.

Continue reading “Member News: Ballots, Babies, and Banners of Peace”

SHCY Biennial Article Award

Call for Nominations: Best Journal Article on the History of Children and Youth

Nominations are accepted from journals, editors, and self-nominations by authors. All are eligible for the award, except for current members of the prizes award committees and current members of the SHCY executive committee and officers.
Continue reading “SHCY Biennial Article Award”

Grace Abbott Best Book Award

Call for Nominations: Best Book on the History of Children and Youth
Grace Abbott Best Book Award Published in Calendar Years 2011 or 2012

The Society for the History of Children and Youth (SHCY) is pleased to call for nominations for the best book published in English on the history of children, childhood, or youth (broadly construed) published in calendar years 2011 or 2012.
The award of a plaque and a check for $500 US will be presented at the 2013 SHCY Biennial Conference (June 25-27) at Nottingham University, United Kingdom.

Continue reading “Grace Abbott Best Book Award”

Member News: Home Front Girl

New book released from Chicago Review Press: Home Front Girl: A Diary of Love, Literature, and Growing up in Wartime America

Kept from the early 1930s through the mid-1940s by a young Chicagoan and edited by her daughter, this diary provides a fascinating, detailed record of the life of an astute and witty teenage girl during the Great Depression and the lead-up to World War II. The only daughter of a working-class Swedish immigrant and his wife, this everyday girl describes her life growing up in the city—from pining for handsome boys in ROTC uniforms to her love for the Art Institute, Lake Michigan and, later, her campus life at the University of Chicago in the early 1940s. Along the way she ruminates about the daily headlines and major touchstones of the era: the Lindbergh kidnapping, FDR on the radio, Goodbye Mr. Chips and Citizen Kane, Garbo, Churchill, Hitler, war work, and Red Cross meetings. Poems, doodles, and drawings of the latest dress, outfit, or haircut accompany the entries. The diary is an entertaining and delightful read as well as a vivid account of a real American girl’s lived experiences.

Continue reading “Member News: Home Front Girl”

Contribute Your News to the SHCY Website

Beginning in January 2013, SHCY will post member news monthly. News includes significant scholarly achievements, such as books published or reviewed, articles published, websites launched, awards for research or teaching, new syllabi, or press interviews (text, audio, or video).

Please send us your news! News is welcome about publications, awards, or interviews in any language.

Email: info@shcy.localhost
Tweet: @shcyhome

Continue reading “Contribute Your News to the SHCY Website”

SHCY Sessions at American Historical Association Meeting

SHCY will sponsor or co-sponsor four sessions at the upcoming American Historical Association meeting in New Orleans, January 3-6, 2013.

1. Freedom as Work, Freedom to Work: Childhood and the Meaning of Independent Labor in U.S. History
Friday, January 4, 2013
10:30 AM-12:00 PM
AHA Session 91

2. Many Lives, Many Places, Many Stories: Spaces of Childhood in Early Modern Spain
Friday, January 4, 2013
10:30 AM-12:00 PM
AHA Session 94

3. Fighting for the Future: American Social Reformers, Race, and Nineteenth-Century Institutions for Children
Friday, January 4, 2013
2:30 PM-4:30 PM
Society for the History of Children and Youth Session 3

4. Feeding Tomorrow’s Citizens: Conflicts and Negotiations over Food for Children in Twentieth-Century North America
Sunday, January 6, 2013
11:00 AM-1:00 PM
AHA Session 271

For full descriptions, visit:

http://aha.confex.com/aha/2013/webprogram/Symposium1305.html .

SHCY Outreach Grant Recipients

The Outreach Committee and Executive Committee announce the first set of $500 Outreach Grants. They go to:

The Childhood and Youth Studies Collaborative at the Institute for Advanced Studies (IAS), University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, to support faculty and students from other colleges and universities in the Upper Midwest to travel to Minneapolis and participate in a series of workshops and presentations throughout the spring semester 2013.
Applicants: Mary Jo Maynes, Kysa Hubbard, and Emily Bruce.

The University of North Texas Digital Scholarship Co-Operative to support “They leave me and I love them more”: A Symposium on the Legacies of Maurice Sendak” on April 26, 2013. The audience includes UNT faculty, students, and staff, and members of the community.
Applicant: Spencer D. C. Keralis.

Carolina Seminar, UNC-Chapel Hill, to support lecture by Margaret Peacock on Cold War Kids: Images of Soviet-American Childhood and the Collapse of Consensus, 1945-1968 (tentatively scheduled for late November 2012). The seminar theme is “Russia and Its Neighbors, East and West.” The audience is UNC-Chapel faculty, undergraduate and graduate students, and the community.
Applicant: Jacqueline M. Olich.

SHCY and the Berkshire Conference

SHCY is willing to assist in helping individual members to find a place on panels related to the history of children and youth at the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians to be held in Toronto in May 2014. You can find the conference announcement at the Berks Conference website.

If you have an individual paper which you would be interested in having included on a panel please send your abstract (max 250 words), a short cv, and an indication of the conference themes to which you think it best relates to both Shurlee Swain at Shurlee.Swain@acu.edu.au and Rebecca de Schweinitz at rld@byu.edu

The deadline for submissions to the Conference is January 13th, but for the purposes of putting panels together please submit by Dec. 14th.

Panel Proposals for Upcoming SHCY Conference

Abstracts for panels, roundtable discussions, and research-in-progress workshops for the SHCY Sixth Biennial Conference (Nottingham University, June 25-27, 2013) are due Oct. 31.

The Program Committee invites scholars to submit proposals on any aspect of the histories of children and youth, from any place and in any era. Sessions that examine space and childhood in historically and geographically specific settings are encouraged.

The H-Childhood listserv provides a forum for seeking potential panelists with similar interests. Recent posts have solicited papers for panels on plasticine cities, childhood and urban segregation, childhood and religion, spaces inhabited by teenagers in the 1950s, children and technology, and more – all available in the September discussion logs.

For more information, see the Conference section of this website.