The Girls’ History and Culture Network Newsletter: Spring 2018

From the Editors
This special announcement is for our Call for Papers for the Girl History and Culture Network at SHCY 2019 Conference, 26-28 June, Australian Catholic University, Sydney, Australia.

Please consider sending your conference proposals to the Girls’ History and Culture Network with the Society for the History of Children and Youth (SHCY). We invite submissions for the upcoming biannual conference: “Encounters and Exchanges,” June 26-28, at Australian Catholic University in Sydney, Australia. The full CFP below encourages submissions through working groups:

http://shcyhome.org/2018/03/shcy-2019-conference-cfp/

All SHCY working groups and regional networks can submit two panel proposals for consideration by the program committee. As co-chairs of the Girls’ History & Culture Network, we invite you to send us individual paper proposals that we can organize into panels, workshops, roundtables, etc., or you can organize a panel and submit your proposal. If you’ve already submitted a session or paper, feel free to forward it to us to see if it might fit into a Girls’ History & Culture Network panel.

Any individual papers or panels not sponsored by our Network will be forwarded for consideration under the general call for papers. The advantage of sending your papers through the group is that our two panels are more likely to be accepted. We aim to assemble individual submissions into panels in order to increase the likely hood of acceptance.

Sessions last 90 minutes, with at least 15 minutes discussion, leaving some flexibility in what we put together (ex. 20 minutes for 3 panelists; 15 minutes for 4 panelists).

In order to submit our proposals for panels by the May 30, 2018 deadline, we would like to have proposals by May 28.

Feel free to contact us to discuss ideas concerning panels or the GHCN.

Please send your proposal to forman-brunellm@umkc.edu.

Your co-chairs,

Miriam Forman-Brunell
Professor of History
UMKC
Forman-BrunellM@umkc.edu

Ashley E. Remer
Founder/Head Girl
Girl Museum
ashley@girlmuseum.org

Conferences

SHCY 2019 Conference CFP: 26-28 June, Australian Catholic University, Sydney, Australia.
Conference Theme: “Encounters and Exchanges”
Proposal Submission Deadline: Wednesday, 30 May, 2018

The Society for the History of Children and Youth invites proposals for panels, roundtables, workshops or papers that explore histories of children and youth from any place and in any era. We particularly encourage proposals for complete sessions, rather than individual papers, and we are interested in proposals which explore a theme or idea across diverse chronological or geographical settings. We also strongly encourage panels, workshops and roundtables which propose innovative presentation styles, particularly those which show that they will promote discussion and interactive exchanges of ideas.

We encourage all proposals to consider how their work might build on the 2019 conference theme: “Encounters and Exchanges.” The theme invites reflection on the many ways in which relational interactions shape the experience and understandings of childhood and youth. Given the conference’s location, proposals might consider the significance of geography, nation, culture or place, but they could also conceptualise the theme more broadly. How do we understand personal relationships with parents, siblings and friends? How do states, schools and religious institutions interact with children and young people? How do larger forces like colonialism and empire shape the opportunities for encounters and exchanges between children across time and place? How do we encounter our own memories of childhood? How do particular theoretical frameworks or interdisciplinary studies invite deeper exploration of the conference theme?

Proposals which consider the potential of scholars of children and youth to make impactful exchanges beyond academia are also encouraged. What role can history play in developing government policy? How have/do historical experts approach the court room? What is the future of digital history, and other innovations which seek to present history in new ways and make it accessible to wider audiences? How can academic studies impact the school classroom—and vice versa? How do we write children and youth into national histories? How does history place itself in conversation with art, film and literature? What are the other exchanges and encounters you see as critical for the future of the history of children and youth?

The SHCY 2019 biannual international conference is especially focused on enabling the participation of people from across the globe, and is therefore mindful of keeping the conference costs very modest. Australian Catholic University is supporting the conference by funding some travel bursaries to assist students undertaking research degrees to attend the conference. These will be awarded based on merit and need. Please see the submission guidelines for further details.

For the complete CFP, go to their site.

GHCN is your network. Send us any news, publications, announcements, conference notices, podcasts, blogs, CFP, etc., and we will share them with our community. We will be publishing this newsletter on a quarterly basis, with informal announcements sent out as emails or via social media.

CFP: SHCY sponsored panels at the PCB-AHA meeting in Santa Clara, California, August 2-4, 2018

CFP: SHCY sponsored panels at the PCB-AHA meeting in Santa Clara, California, August 2-4, 2018
Deadline: March 2, 2018

The Society for the History of Children and Youth (SHCY) is hoping to sponsor 2 panels for the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association meeting in August 2018. Any area within the history of children and youth is welcome. For more information about the conference, please visit the associated website. The PCB-AHA especially welcomes involvement by junior and non-tenure-track faculty, and graduate students. Anyone can participate as long as s/he is an AHA member at the time of our conference, regardless of affiliation or location.

If you’re interested please submit a proposal by email to catjones@ucsc.edu with SHCY PCB-AHA proposal in the subject line by March 2, 2018.

Following the PCB-AHA guidelines, proposals must include a contact person; a title and 250-word abstract of the panel, paper, or roundtable; the title and brief description of each presentation; a one-page C.V. (including the email address and affiliation) of each participant; and any AV requests.

Reminder CFP: Childhood and Youth Network of the Social Science History Association – Deadline February 16

CFP: Childhood and Youth Network of the Social Science History Association
“Histories of Disadvantage: Meanings, Mechanisms, and Politics”
Phoenix, AZ; November 8-11, 2018
Submission Deadline: February 16, 2018

We invite you to participate in the annual meeting of the Social Science History Association by submitting a session proposal or paper to the Childhood and Youth Network of the SSHA. The conference will take place in Phoenix on November 8-11, 2018. For more information on the conference as well as the general call for proposals, see the SSHA website: http://www.ssha.org. The deadline for full panel or individual paper proposals is February 16, 2018.

The SSHA particularly emphasizes interdisciplinary and transnational research, and the annual meeting provides a very supportive environment in which to present new work. The theme of the 2018 conference is “Histories of Disadvantage: Meanings, Mechanisms, and Politics” though papers on any other aspects of the history of children and childhood are also certainly welcome. Some possible topics include (but are not limited to):

Children, Youth, and Political Movements
Youth Empowerment, Resistance, and Activism
Children and Conflict
Child Rights and Governance
Indigenous Childhoods and Children
Children and Globalization
Child Migrants and Refugees
Children and the Environment
Children and the Media
Turning Points in Childhood History
Youth and Commodification
Spaces of Childhood
Children and Familial Relationships
Child Labor
Institutions/Institutionalization of Childhood
Schooling and Education

We especially encourage complete panels, which should include at least 4 papers and presenters from more than one academic institution and discipline. Other formats, including roundtable discussions and book sessions, are also possible. Please do get in touch with the network chairs if you have an idea for a session and need help gathering presenters.

Proposals can be submitted by means of a web conference management system. If you haven’t used the system previously you will need to create an account, which is a very simple process. Graduate students presenting at the conference may apply for a travel grant from the SSHA.

If you need help making a submission or advice about a proposal or have any questions, please contact the Childhood and Youth network co-chairs:

Emily Bruce: bruce088@umn.edu

Elizabeth Dillenburg: eadillenburg@gmail.com

Mateusz Świetlicki: mateusz.swietlicki@uwr.edu.pl

Last Minute Search fo Co-Panelist for UK Children’s History Society (Deadline Nov. 1)

Karen Balcom posted the following call for panelists on H-Childhood:

Hello –

I am making a last minute effort to form a panel for the Children’s History Society conference at the University of Greenwich in June 2018. Theme of the Conference is Children and Youth on the Move. My paper would be on Greek adolescents and young adults in the 1950s who were relinquished for adoption by their parents in Greece, and then adopted by Aunts and Uncles in the US as a way to facilitate migration to the US. I’m looking for other schoalrs treating adoption as migration, or exploring other modes of child migration esp. in the immediate aftermath of WWII.

The call for papers is at: https://histchild2018.wordpress.com/2017/07/02/call-for-papers/ Deadline is Nov. 1st.

Contact me: balcomk@mcmaster.ca

Thanks! Karen

The SHCY invites members to organize regional networks (or) field working-groups.

WHY CALL FOR REGIONAL NETWORKS & WORKING-GROUPS?
SHCY regional networks or field-specific working-groups are a means for researchers to engage in long-term projects under SHCY auspices with a defined focus or approach to the historical study of childhood and youth. They may be defined geographically, by nation states, by languages; by various groups, institutions, or discourses (girlhood, education, race, psychology, etc.); by conceptual or methodological focal points (popular culture, social movements, governmentality, demography, oral history, etc.); or by period (early-modern, Victorian, post-WWII, etc.).

We hope member-created networks and working-groups will allow scholars to create spaces for their extraordinarily diverse interests at our conferences, within our journal, and through other activities. If members develop them avidly, they may enhance the relevance of our events and publications for specific regional and field connections and collaborations, while maintaining the Society’s commitment to serve as a larger umbrella for international, interdisciplinary exchanges in the history of childhood and youth.

WHAT BENEFITS MIGHT NETWORKS & GROUPS PROVIDE?
SHCY regional networks or SHCY field-specific working-groups will receive priority treatment when establishing roundtable, panels, or other sessions at our biennial conferences. They will have access to SHCY website for posting content (a website that receives many thousands of discrete visitors each month). Such groups and networks may propose special issues for the Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth. Recognition as a standing network or working group may help our members work collaboratively to win grants, hold regional or topically specific colloquium, produce edited collections, and even advance academic programming in the study of childhood and youth at our Universities and Colleges.

WHAT’S THE PROCESS FOR STARTING A SHCY NETWORK OR WORKING-GROUP?
Step 1: Discuss your idea and gather interest with colleagues in your regional, topical, period, or theoretical area. Read the relevant SHCY by-law (Article V) below and at http://shcyhome.org/about/

Step 2: Come up with a name, a chair or co-chairs, produce a statement of purpose for your network or working-group. Gather c.v.’s and consider immediate steps or activities you would like to do together.

Step 3: Send to SHCY President your statement of purpose, name the chair or co-chair with a 300-500 word prospectus about your plans. Proposals should include the c.v.’s of 3 to 5 colleagues committed to the project, but may name other interested scholars.

Step 4: SHCY President will present proposals for regional networks or area working-groups to the Executive Committee for evaluation; and will communicate the Executive’s response back to the applicants.

Step 5: Once approved, begin working and producing scholarly goods in collaboration with others. Continue to consult with SHCY officers and conference organizers.

Sincerely Yours,
Patrick Ryan
SHCY President
pryan2@uwo.ca

—————————————–
Relevant SHCY By-Law:

Article V

Section 1: Any SHCY member may propose for approval by SHCY Executive Committee a standing working-group or regional network of the Society.

Section 2: SHCY working groups and regional networks would report to SHCY Executive Committee, and will share the following features:
A – a chair or co-chairs.
B – a statement of purpose.

Section 3: Participation in the working-groups’ or networks’ activities ordinarily will require SHCY membership. Specific practices will be developed in consultation with the Executive Committee.

Section 4: Funds raised by the working-groups or networks (outside of SHCY membership) will be accounted for, dispensed, and held by the groups or networks.

Journal of History of Childhood and Youth seeks articles on children and museums

The Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth seeks articles (8000 words) for a themed issue on the portrayal of the histories of children and of childhood in museum settings. The issue will be guest-edited by Loren Lerner, Professor of Art History at Concordia University in Montreal.

Potential topics for articles include:

  • histories of childhood museums: their origins, ideologies, changing philosophies, and current practices;
  • frameworks and perspectives on national museum collections of childhood objects;
  • studies on the constructions of children and youth in recent exhibitions across diverse cultures and socio-economic backgrounds;
  • discussions on the evolution of artefacts in museums reflective of childhood and child rearing such as toys and games, clothing, furniture, books and diverse items related to home and school life;
  • debates on the issues, practices, and policies of childhood museums including collection development, education, research, and other subjects of concern to academic scholarship and, or the local community.

Proposals for articles to be sent to Loren Lerner at loren.lerner@sympatico.ca by 1 April 2017 should include:

  • Name of author, institutional affiliation, email address
  • Title of article
  • 300-500 words abstract of the article
  • Estimated number and type of illustrations
  • 50-words brief bio

Successful proposers will be notified by 1 May 2017, with finished articles to be delivered by 1 September 2017. Publication is projected for Summer 2018.

JHCY CFP: Histories of Children and Childhood in Museum Settings

The Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth seeks submissions on the portrayal of the histories of children and of childhood in museum settings.  Individual articles (8000 words), a roundtable (perhaps 20,000 words by five or six different authors), or even a proposal for a special issue would be welcome.  Extensive illustrations would be a possibility.  Queries should be directed to James Marten, editor, JHCY, at james.marten@marquett.edu.  Submission guidelines can be found at https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_the_history_of_childhood_and_youth/guidelines.html.

CFP: (Re) Examining Historical Childhoods: Literary, Cultural, Social

(Re) Examining Historical Childhoods: Literary, Cultural, Social
An Australasian Society for the History of Children and Youth Symposium
December 12-13, 2016
Melbourne, Australia
Deakin University

In this inaugural Australasian Society for the History of Children and Youth symposium, we are keenly interested in bringing together scholars of the history of children and childhood to consider new perspectives, new methodologies, and new cross- disciplinary frameworks that will enrich the field. We invite proposals for panels, papers, or roundtables that explore histories of children and youth from any place and in any era.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
• Representations of the histories children and childhood in the media, film, literature, music and popular culture
• The ‘difficult’ histories of children and youth
• Histories that consider children’s agency and voice
• Children and their relation to space, place, and the built environment
• Education and the histories of children and youth
• Material culture and the commemoration of children’s heritage
• Histories of ‘girlhood’ and ‘boyhood’
• Cross-cultural and Indigenous experiences of childhood across time
• Histories of childhood and public policy

Paper and panel proposals are due no later than 15 May 2016. They should include the following information in a single document and should be sent to the conference convener Kristine Moruzi (kmoruzi@deakin.edu.au). Notifications of acceptance will be made by 15 June.

1. Name of presenter, institutional affiliation, address and email.
2. Title of individual paper
3. 250-word abstract of paper
4. Brief bio (max 50 words) for presenter
5. Audio-visual requirements

Other members of the programme committee are:
Kate Darian-Smith, University of Melbourne
Margot Hillel, Australian Catholic University
Nell Musgrove, Australian Catholic University
Carla Pascoe, University of Melbourne

Indigenous Children’s Rights

Canadian Journal of Children’s Rights
Call for Manuscripts, Special Issue: Indigenous Children’s Rights

A special issue of the Canadian Journal of Children’s Rights dedicated to exploring rights in the lives of Indigenous children is open for submissions. For this special issue we invite a range of contributions including scholarly essays, original research articles, comparative analyses, critical reviews, advocacy and policy articles as well as personal narratives, interviews, oral histories, and poetry. We are interested in presenting a wide range of perspectives relating to Indigenous children and rights.

For more information, download the full CFP (PDF)..

Feminism and the Politics of Childhood

Feminism and the Politics of Childhood: Friends or foes?
Workshop at UCL Institute of Education, London, UK, 16-17th November 2015

This workshop will bring together community- and university-based academics and activists to unpack perceived conflicts between children’s interests and women’s interests (which themselves are heterogeneous) and, more broadly, intersections and antagonisms between various forms of feminism and the politics of childhood.

The lives of women and children are deeply entangled and the way relations between them are conceptualized has implications for approaches to service provision, public education, and social movement building about critical issues including childcare, domestic work and global care chains, familial violence, and the division of labor. Children, to varying degrees, are positioned as primarily dependent and in need of care, and women take by far the greatest responsibility for this, whether in families, education, formal care settings, global care chains, and so on. Women and children have often been elided or linked ideologically. Both feminist and childhood scholars and activists have worked against this conflation, but, in so doing, have been criticized for portraying women and children’s interests as opposing and adversarial (Thorne, 1987). Feminist scholars have argued that prioritizing children’s rights has led to increases in women’s ascribed responsibilities for children’s wellbeing (Molyneux, 2006; Newberry, 2014) and that rising attention to “the child” in the policy arena has side-lined women’s citizenship demands (Dobrowolsky and Jenson, 2004). Childhood theorists have commented that feminism is an “adultist” enterprise, rendering children largely absent from the social world and sociological consideration except as objects of social reproduction (Mayall, 2002). Concerns have been raised that this antagonism reduces the complexity of adult-child relations – which include joy, love, reciprocal concern, and solidarity – solely to that of work and burden (Riley, 1987).

Until now, there has been limited attention to the ways these perceived antipathies might be addressed (but see Alanen, 1994; Burman, 2008; Oakley, 1994; Thorne, 1987). We propose to use this workshop as a means to initiate such a dialogue. We are inviting abstracts which address the following, or other relevant, themes:
• How do we ensure the well-being of children and women, particularly in contexts where their interests may (appear to) be in conflict?
• How might a conversation between feminism and the politics of childhood reconcile these tensions?
o Are women’s and children’s interests necessarily opposed or inevitably linked?
o What are the consequences of denaturalizing motherhood and childhood for women and children?
o How do we conceptualize women and children’s involvement in creating a gendered and generationed social order?
• What are the implications of theorizing women and children together?
o Does discussing women and children together reify their relationship?
o Where do men, the state, and society fit?
o To what extent does this reinforce compulsory heterosexuality?

To promote in-depth discussion and debate, workshop spaces will be limited to a small number of presenters and participants. Working papers of no more than 4000 words will be pre-circulated. At the workshop, each presenter will give a short synopsis which will be followed by discussion. We anticipate producing an edited volume from the workshop. All participants (including presenters) will be charged a nominal fee of £20.

To apply to present: Please send titles and abstracts of no more than 250 words to r.rosen@ioe.ac.uk by 15th August 2015 (Subject line: PRESENTER Feminism and Childhood). Full papers will be due 26th October 2015.

To apply to participate: If you wish to participate in the workshop as a non-presenter, please submit an expression of interest of no more than 250 words outlining relevant academic and/or community-based experience to r.rosen@ioe.ac.uk by 30th September 2015 (Subject line: PARTICIPANT Feminism and Childhood).

Hosted by the Childhood and Gender Stream (Social Science Research Unit) and Gender and Sexuality Studies, UCL.

Special Issue: Histories of Play

International Journal of Play
Call for papers for forthcoming Special Issue: Histories of Play

The universality of children’s play crosses times, places and cultures — and histories of play offer unique perspectives on children and their worlds, and the wider societies they inhabit. This special issue examines the histories of play across historical periods, exploring (but not limited) to such topics as:

• continuity and change in children’s play and playlore
• histories of the material and oral cultures of play
• the economies and consumption of games, toys and play “things”
• the spaces and environments of play in historical context
• documenting histories of play through visual, oral and other sources
• transnational and comparative histories of games and playlore
• remembering play: nostalgia, “kidults” and memorialization
• children’s voices in the history of play

The guest editors of the Histories of Play special issue (no. 3 in 2016, appearing in December) are Kate Darian-Smith (University of Melbourne) and Simon Sleight (King’s College London). Potential contributors are invited to send an abstract of 300 words to the editors by 1 November 2015 in the first instance.

Full papers of up to 7,000 words, which will go through a blind peer-review process prior to publication, need to be submitted by 1 April 2016. Suggestions for shorter pieces of up to 2,500 words on historical archives and cultural collections relating to the histories of play are also welcome.

Please check the International Journal of Play (Taylor and Francis Online) website for details on the journal and regarding presentation of material:
http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rijp20/current#.VZINnvmqpBc

Email contact for further information, enquiries and to submit abstracts:
Kate Darian-Smith: k.darian-smith@unimelb.edu.au
Simon Sleight: simon.sleight@kcl.ac.uk

Horrible Histories?

Horrible Histories? Children’s Lives in Historical Contexts
16 and 17 June 2016, King’s College London

It is now over forty years since the bold declaration of psychohistorian Lloyd deMause that “The history of childhood is a nightmare from which we have only recently begun to awaken.” Stirred by such claims, scholars have subsequently tested the “nightmare thesis” for both the pre-modern and modern eras, locating children’s agency in unexpected places and stressing the contingencies of context, gender, ethnicity, age, class, caste and sexuality. Narratives of historic and contemporary institutional abuse, however, together with insights concerning the legacies of forced child migration, children’s labours and other challenging aspects of childhood experience, suggest that sorrow rather than joy characterises much scholarship on children and childhood. Should this be so?

In another context, since 1993 the phenomenally successful Horrible Histories books, stage plays and television series have helped introduce countless thousands of children around the world to the past. As their titles indicate, Horrible Histories also examine difficult and sometimes grisly historical episodes. Progressive narratives are at work here too, reinforced by children’s museum exhibits emphasizing an emergence from the “dark ages” of childhood in the twentieth century.

“Horrible Histories? Children’s Lives in Historical Contexts” is the launch conference marking the inauguration of the new UK-based Children’s History Society. Offering a forum for historical reflections from established and upcoming historians of children, childhood and youth, we also anticipate that this will be a platform for school-age scholars to reflect on the ways they respond to the history. This two-day conference invites paper proposals on the following themes:

• Dealing with difficult history and heritage
• Children’s histories and the longue durée
• The “West and the rest” in children’s history
• Definitions of subjecthood and status
• Pain and resilience
• Archival approaches for retrieving children’s agency
• The things of childhood
• Children’s places and places for children
• Play as protest, recreation and the “work” of childhood
• Children’s histories in museums, online and in the media
• The histories of children’s places and places for children
• Future trajectories for researching children’s histories

Please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words, together with a two-page CV, to both simon.sleight@kcl.ac.uk and M.C.H.Martin@greenwich.ac.uk by 1 December 2015. Applicants will be notified of the outcome in January. Panel submissions featuring three papers of 15-20 minutes apiece are also encouraged, particularly for panels showcasing in concert transnational and/or long chronological perspectives. Note that our definition of children is flexible, reflecting the multiple constructions through time of childhood as a social category.

The conference will be free to attend, courtesy of the Menzies Centre for Australian Studies and the Department of History, both at King’s College London. Further details will follow regarding accommodation options, conference-related activities and Society administration. If you would like to become involved in the running of the Children’s History Society, please email simon.sleight@kcl.ac.uk and M.C.H.Martin@gre.ac.uk to express your interest.

Dr Simon Sleight (King’s College London) and Dr Mary Clare Martin (University of Greenwich).

New Book Series: Children, Youth, and War

James Marten and the University of Georgia Press announce a new books series, “Children, Youth, and War.”  The series aims to broaden understanding of the experiences and points of view of children and youth during wartime as actors, victims and observers, as well as the effects of armed conflict on the nations, communities, and families in which those young people live. It will also provide historic contexts for such urgent contemporary topics as war refugees, under-age soldiers, and the politicization of childhood, among many others.

More details can be found in the official release at: http://news.uga.edu/releases/article/uga-press-children-youth-war-series/.  Jim will be available to talk to prospective authors at the Society for the History of Childhood and Youth conference in Vancouver.

CFP: Youth Circulations

Youth Circulations (www.youthcirculations.com) is an online exhibit that traces the real and imagined circulations of global youth. As a collection of photographic representations, Youth Circulations illuminates a critical disconnect between the nuanced, transnational lives of the young migrants and the active reduction of these lives into abbreviated tropes–the vulnerable victim<http://www.youthcirculations.com/#/victimized/>, the delinquent<http://www.youthcirculations.com/#/delinquent/>, and so on–in mainstream news sources and policy reports.

Youth Circulations invites scholars and artists to submit work that considers these primary circulations:

  1. Youth themselves circulate. Through transnational movement and global technologies, young people circulate between nations, communities, and virtual spaces.
  2. Global youth are agents of circulation. As transnational actors, young migrants shape and contribute to global flows of people, capital, ideas, and values.
  3. Ideas circulate about global youth. Put forth in the media, in policy reports, and by advocacy and opposition efforts, representations of young migrants are power-filled and consequential, both in and beyond communities of origin and destination.

Submission format and length is flexible. We invite proposals for an individual blog post or photo essay; a brief analysis of a photo, series of photos, or a gallery on the site; a written or photographic  “conversation” between two or more individuals; or any other work that considers, critiques, or creatively counters so many circulating images of global youth.

With a wide, interdisciplinary readership, Youth Circulations offers artists, scholars, and practitioners a dynamic space to present and interact with ideas about age, mobility, and representation. To contribute, please email youthcirculations@gmail.com.

Unheard Learners: Children and Youth Experiences in Neoliberal Schools

Call for Manuscripts

The Journal of Critical Education Policy Studies 
Special Issue: December 2015

Guest Editors: Debbie Sonu, Hunter College, City University of New York and Julie Gorlewski, State University of New York at New Paltz.

Chief and Managing Editor: Professor Dave Hill, Research Professor of Education at Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, England

The Journal of Critical Education Policy Studies (JCEPS) and guest editors Debbie Sonu and Julie Gorlewski are seeking manuscripts for a special issue that is scheduled for publication in December 2015.

This special issue, entitled “Unheard Learners: Children and Youth Experiences in Neoliberal Schools,” aims to feature the work of established and emerging scholars from a variety of disciplines who explore school reform and schooling experiences from the standpoint of children and youth in public and private K-12 institutions from any socio-economic, cultural, or geographic location within the United States.

We invite research articles that draw from empirical work, as well as conceptual or theoretical papers that use in some form the direct perspectives of children and youth as learners in the current context of neoliberal school cultures, including but not limited to issues of testing, discipline, relationships, authority, states of being, curriculum, and pedagogy. Contributors may take up a wide range of theoretical frameworks, including feminist, Marxist, postcolonial, poststructural, psychoanalytic, critical, and historical lenses to present divergent perspectives that link children and youth with the urgent and immediate changes that are impacting schools today.

Full manuscripts of 6000-8000 words are expected for submission.

Timeline:

Submission Deadline: October 1, 2015
Notification by: October 15
Reviews returned by: October 15
Final Revisions due: November 1
Publication date: December 7

All submissions must strictly adhere to JCEPS style guidelines:www.jceps.com/submissions. Manuscripts must have a title, name of author(s), university/institutional affiliation including city, state (if USA), country, abstract (150 words), key words (5-7), main document, references, and at the end of the manuscript, author/writer details, and correspondence information.

All inquiries can be made to either dsonu@hunter.cuny.edu orgorlewsj@newpaltz.edu.

2nd Childhood Studies Colloquium

The 2nd Childhood Studies Colloquium will be held in Dunedin on 20th and 21st October 2015 on the theme: What does Childhood Studies mean for research, policy and practice?

Children and young people deal with a vast range of widening inequalities in their social and physical environments. Researchers from many disciplines, practitioners, policy makers and activists often work individually to improve the life of our young citizens. While children and young people’s economic, social, cultural and physical wellbeing lie at the heart of such efforts, debates continue about what working under the umbrella term of “Childhood Studies” actually means theoretically and practically to address the pressing issues facing children and young people in the 21st century.

This colloquium will provide an opportunity reflect on how we conceptualise and put childhood studies into diverse practices. Critical reflections on, and discussions about, the ways forward to improve and contribute to all aspects of children and young people’s wellbeing here in Aotearoa and across the globe lie at the heart of the colloquium.

This interdisciplinary colloquium will be of relevance and interest to a wide range of participants including academics, researchers, students, advocates, policy makers and practitioners.

The colloquium follows on from the very successful 1st Childhood Studies Colloquium held in Auckland in November last year. The 2015 Colloquium is being co-hosted by the University of Otago Children and Young People as Social Actors Research Cluster, the Children’s Issues Centre and the organisers of the 1st Colloquium. We are grateful to the University of Otago Humanities Divison for their generous financial support for this event. The 20th anniversary of the Children’s Issues Centre will also be celebrated at the Colloquium.

Our three keynote speakers will be making the following presentations:

· Professor Nigel Thomas, Professor of Childhood and Youth Research, School of Social Work, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, England: Recognition, capability and children’s participation in society: A new move in childhood studies?
· Associate Professor Affrica Taylor, Geographies of Education and Childhood, University of Canberra, Australia: What does the more-than-human turn mean for childhood studies research?
· Alison Cleland, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of Auckland; Chair, Action for Children and Youth Aotearoa: Social justice for Aotearoa’s children: A child rights framework.

Abstracts are due by 3 July to 2015csc@otago.ac.nz. Any inquiries should be directed to the Children’s Issues Centre – Ph: (03) 479 5038. Email: 2015csc@otago.ac.nz.

CFP: Memories of (post) Socialist Childhood and Schooling

This book aims to bring together those who had first-hand experiences with and accounts of (post)socialist schooling and childhood as cultural insiders to engage in remembering and (re)narrating their experiences. We understand —memory not as history but as “a lived process of making sense of time and the experience of it” to explore “relations between public and private life, agency and power, and the past, present and future” (Keightley, 2010, p. 55-56). The focus is on the exploration of how childhood and schooling were constituted and experienced in (post)socialist contexts and (re)narrated at the present. Childhood as a socio-historical construct provides an analytical incision into the social issues and concerns regarding historical socialism, cultural/ideological changes, and subject formation. As Gonick & Gannon (2014, p.6) argue, “rather than truth of particular lives, … we are interested in using memory stories to examine the ways in which individuals are made social, how we are discursively, affectively, materially constituted in particular moments that are inherently unstable” and to open up ways to explore “how things come to matter in the ways they do” (Davies et al., 2013).

For more information or to express your interest to participate in this book project, please contact Iveta Silova (isilova@gmail.com), Zsuzsa Millei (zsuzsa.millei@uta.fi), Olena Aydarova (aydarova@msu.edu).

Full details are available in a downloadable PDF of the Call for Chapters.

CFP: International Girls Studies Association’s Inaugural Conference

The International Girls’ Studies Association are seeking submissions for our inaugural conference from April 7 – 9th 2016 at the University of East Anglia. The inaugural conference seeks to bring together researchers and students working on girls and girlhood in any part of the world and in any discipline or interdisciplinary field.

Girls’ Studies has become one of the most dynamic academic fields, encompassing a vast array of disciplines and interdisciplinary approaches. This conference aims to bring together scholars from across the world to explore experiences of girlhood, recent developments within the field, investigating new questions and revisiting historical issues.

We seek proposals that address some of the key issues in girls studies and we welcome both individual and panel presentations. Moreover, we are also keen to move beyond the traditional conference format and would encourage collaborative work, creative, visual, screenings and performance based work. We are also keen to invite proposals from individuals working in collaboration with girls, the community and partner organisations.

Topics may include (but are not limited to)
· Histories of girlhood
· Global girlhood(s)
· Intersectional girlhood
· Queer girls
· Representation of girlhood
· Intergenerational girlhoods
· Girlhood and consumption
· Mediated girlhoods
· Methodological approaches to girls’ studies
· Girls and feminism
· Girls and sport
· Girls and politics
· Girls and education
· Young femininities
· Body image
· Subcultures and girlhood
· Girls and digital media
· Girls and activism
· Girls and literature
· Girls and popular culture
· Girlhood during austerity
· Girls and sexuality
· Girls and health
· Neoliberal girlhoods
· Ethnographies of girlhood

Submissions:
Abstracts of 250 words, proposals for pre-constituted panels (250 words per panellist) and proposals for creative and alternative presentations (250 words) should be sent to igsa.2016@uea.ac.uk by 1st September 2015. All submissions should be accompanied by brief bio.

Any questions or queries can be sent to igsa.2016@uea.ac.uk.

CFP: Special Issue of Gender Issues on Girls’ Studies

A special issue of Gender Issues is now open for submission of articles by those conducting original applied research to the field of girls’ studies. We seek articles that unravel the constructions of girlhood and invite a critical discussion of issues including but not limited to: health, social justice, and well being; sites of social, political, and community action; trans and gender non-conforming girls; educating girls; sexuality and representations of girls; girls around the globe. Authors should including abstracts and brief bios. We would also welcome short book reviews that cover the field of girls’ studies. A general description of what the journal seeks to publish follows:

Gender Issues is multidisciplinary and cross-national in scope focusing on gender and gender equity. The journal publishes basic and applied research examining gender relationships as well as the impact of economic, legal, political, and social forces on those relationships across four domains:

  1. Understanding gender socialization, personality, and behavior in a gendered context.
  2. Exploring the wide range of relationships within the gender spectrum, such as acquaintances, friendships, romantic, and professional relationships.
  3. Assessing the impact of economic, legal, political, and social changes on gender identity, expression, and gender relations.
  4. Interpreting the impact of economic, legal, political, and social changes on the aspirations, status and roles of people internationally.

Date for Submissions: October 1, 2015

Publication Date: June 2016

Inquires and submissions: https://www.editorialmanager.com/geis/default.aspx

Authors should submit through the Editorial Manager system and note that this article should be saved for the “Girls Studies special issue”.

Gender Studies is published in print and online by Springer Publishing Company. From 1932-1980, Gender Studies was published under the title Feminist Issues. Please visit http://link.springer.com/journal/12147 for further details. Special Attention should be paid to the “For Authors and Editors” section, which includes information about preparing the manuscript for submission. Past articles are also available to read online.

Guest Editor: Elaine J. O’Quinn is a Professor of English and affiliate faculty in Gender, Women’s and Sexuality Studies at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC where she helped develop a minor in Girls’ Studies. Her interests include girls and literacy, and her most recent publication on this topic is Girl’s Literacy Experiences In and Out of School: Learning and Composing Gendered Identities (Routledge 2013).

CFP: Girls’ Economies: Work & Play Cultures

Call for Papers: Girls’ Economies: Work & Play Cultures

Edited by Miriam Forman-Brunell and Diana Anselmo-Sequeira
Foreword by Dr. Eileen Boris

We know more about the history of grownups’ labor than we do about girls’ work, especially in informal domains. We know more about adult women workers than about girlhood employment and work-themed amusements. We know more about girls’ consumption practices than about their production patterns. We know more about childhood and play than we do about how play informs girls’ work skills, sensibilities, and identities as workers. We know more about businessmen and women than about moneymaking girls.

Girls’ Economies: Work & Play Cultures brings into sharp focus the significance of girls’ distinctive labor practices that often overlap with leisured endeavors. By crossing the boundaries between work and play, the margins between girlhood and female adolescence, and the demarcations among various economies, the original essays in this collection traverse the scholarly borders separating the history of labor, play, and business history, women’s history and the history of childhood and adolescence.

This anthology sets out to provide historical, international, and interdisciplinary perspectives on the socio-cultural and economic nature of work in girls’ lived realities and in representations. To that end, we seek previously unpublished essays that examine girls’ often invisible economies (e.g., informal, formal, domestic, household, underground (black economy), plantation, sexual, and sharing economies, etc.) by investigating the distinctive nature of girls’ work patterns that often complicate the lines between manual, domestic, unremunerated play practices, and monetary rewards (e.g., handicrafts; household toys); manifest unique “work cultures” (e.g., DIY participatory cultures) and; employ specific forms of labor, such as the “emotional labor” of Girl Scouts and the “reproductive labor” of girls’ household chores that help to sustain households and enables other family members to engage in paid, productive labor.
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Journal of Popular Music Studies Special Issue on Girls and Popular Music

Guest editors: Sarah Dougher and Diane Pecknold
7,000-word articles due September 1, 2015

The Journal of Popular Music Studies invites submissions for a special issue on Girls and Popular Music. Beginning with the publication of Angela McRobbie’s work on the bedroom music culture of British girls, popular music has been a core aspect of the emergent field of girls’ studies. Conversely, attention to the musical practices of girls and to constructions of girlhood and female youth have revised our understandings of the ways popular music as a whole is produced and consumed. Kyra Gaunt’s discussion of the ways girls’ rhyming and chanting games reflect and reshape the same principles of black music-making as commercial hip-hop; Norma Coates’s suggestion that teenyboppers and groupies provided the foundational low Others against which rock culture secured its own credibility; and Gayle Wald’s interrogation of girlishness as a performative resource through which adult women’s position in popular music is established are only a few examples of critical role real and figurative girls play in shaping popular music and scholarly approaches to it.

In recent years, however, the relationship between girlhood and popular music has undergone significant shifts. The rapidly changing sphere of media and media access is often characterized as a threat to girls, both in terms of morality and productivity, but at the same time it offers them newly visible roles in the music economy as child stars, amateur musicians, and YouTube personalities. New technologies such as mobile recording, social media, YouTube, and blogging as well as new institutional structures, such as digital music distribution, the formalized tween music industry, and the rise of girl-serving organizations based on musicking call for a re-examination of the ways girlhood and female youth are constructed and experienced through popular music.
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CFP: Children’s Rights and Children’s Literature

CHILDREN’S RIGHTS and CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
Special Issue of The Lion and the Unicorn

Guest Editors:
Lara Saguisag, College of Staten Island-City University of New York and Matthew B. Prickett, Rutgers University-Camden

We are seeking papers that investigate the intersections between the histories, theories, and practices of children’s rights and children’s literature. In response to the ratification of the United Nation’s Convention on the Rights of the Child (UN-CRC) in 1989, advocates and scholars have debated the necessity and revealed the complexity of defining and implementing children’s rights across the globe. Critical discourse on children’s rights, however, has not yet fully examined the role that children’s literature plays in shaping, promoting, implementing and interrogating children’s rights. This special issue invites scholars to explore the connections between the institutions of children’s rights and children’s literature.

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CFP: Playthings in Early Modernity

Contributions are sought for an interdisciplinary collection of essays to be edited by Allison Levy and published by Ashgate Publishing Co. in the new book series, Cultures of Play, 1300-1700 (see http://www.ashgate.com/default.aspx?page=5166; series editor Bret Rothstein). Dedicated to early modern playfulness, this series serves two purposes. First, it recounts the history of wit, humor, and games, from jokes and sermons, for instance, to backgammon and blind man’s buff. Second, in addressing its topic – ludic culture – broadly, Cultures of Play also provides a forum for reconceptualizing the play elements of early modern economic, political, religious, and social life.

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CFChapter: Indigenous Youth In The “British World”

The co-editors of “Children, Childhood and Youth in the British World: Historical Perspectives” – under contract with Palgrave Macmillan for publication in 2015 – seek an additional chapter for the volume. We are looking for an expert contribution of up to 6,500 words on the theme of indigenous youth within the historical setting (and conceptualization) of the “British World,” to sit alongside 15 other chapters already commissioned. The proposed chapter can address any non-Australian part of the British World, such as southeast Asia, Africa, Canada or the Caribbean.

There is a tight deadline for this submission, and details concerning this and other aspects of the publication can be discussed by emailing the editors at the following addresses: simon.sleight@kcl.ac.uk; shirleene.robinson@mq.edu.au.

We will be seeking an abstract of c. 400 words and a CV from prospective contributors; please submit these by 31 July to both addresses detailed above. All candidates will be notified of the outcome in early August.

Special Issue: The Media’s Evolving Role in Sex Education

Entertainment media have long been identified as having a key role to play in education about sex and relationships.

All too often in studies of sexual learning the media have been assessed for their potentially negative effects on young people. For example, studies have correlated consumption of particular media forms with early sexual intercourse or teenage pregnancy, while parents and schools have been seen as providing a positive corrective.

However empirical research shows that this simple binary is not always accurate: in some instances entertainment media may offer positive information and representations while school or parents often offer more moralizing or conservative perspectives. For example, a young person growing up in a homophobic family may see happy queer characters in a sitcom; or young people attending a school thatemphasizes young women’s role as gatekeepers and controllers of men’s sexuality may find helpful TV dramas that explore women’s active sexual agency.

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Special Issue of WSQ: CHILD

Call for Papers, Poetry and Prose: WSQ Special Issue, Spring 2015: CHILD

Guest Editors: Sarah Chinn and Anna Mae Duane

Children have always been fraught subjects for feminist scholarship. Women are alternately infantilized and subsumed in service of children. Indeed, nowhere are women’s rights more assiduously attacked than around the question of their biological capacity to bear and raise children. Our concerns in this issue of WSQ, though, are children and childhood themselves: representations of children, children’s experiences, and children’s place in the world.

Recent scholarship in childhood studies has taken on core assumptions around children, especially children’s innocence and their removal from the realm of work and financial gain. And yet children play a crucial role in the global economy. As consumers, children represent an immense market. As producers and workers, children manufacture goods of every kind. Children constitute a significant stream of bodies for trafficking networks of domestic and other kinds of labor, including sex work. And children tried as adults populate prison systems around the world, especially in the United States.

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Lifework and Legacy: Reviewing Iona and Peter Opie’s Contribution to the Study of Play

International Journal of Play: Call for papers for forthcoming Special Issue Lifework and Legacy: Reviewing Iona and Peter Opie’s Contribution to the Study of Play

The work of Iona (1923– ) and Peter Opie (1918–1982) on the play and games of school-aged children will be familiar to many who study the social and cultural aspects of children’s lives.

Working as independent and unfunded scholars, the Opies published five books on this topic: The Lore and Language of Schoolchildren (1959), Children’s Games in Street and Playground (1969), The Singing Game (1985), Children’s Games with Things (1997), and Iona Opie’s solo volume, The People in the Playground (1993). Distilled from data collected principally from schoolchildren during the period 1950–80 (now held at the British Library Sound Archive, the Folklore Society Archives, and the Bodleian Libraries), as well as pioneering historical research, these publications have been widely read and extremely influential.

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Reproductive Tourism: Cross-Border Travel for Abortion and Fertility Services

Reproductive Tourism: Cross-border travel for abortion and fertility services
Edited by Christabelle Sethna and Gayle Davis

In recent years, there has been an awakening of academic and media interest in the concept of medical tourism. Medical tourism, involving travel to obtain medical services outside one’s healthcare jurisdiction, has been characterised as a major transnational growth industry and one which raises fascinating and challenging logistical, legal and ethical questions.

However, among its current weaknesses, the existing literature fails to explore adequately the gendered dimensions of medical tourism, particularly the travel of women. Thus, we currently know little specifically about women’s access to medical services within this medical tourism framework.

A particular area of health care which demands to be addressed through this gendered lens is reproductive tourism. Reproductive tourism is considered a subset of medical tourism, but it is too often associated narrowly with travel to help women designated infertile conceive a child.

The reproductive tourism that we want to examine involves cross-border travel for abortion and fertility services. Given the significant number of women who seek out both of these services and the complex issues which each raises, a collection focusing on women’s cross-border travel, both domestic and international, for the purposes of abortion and/or fertility services, will fill a major gap in the literature on medical tourism.

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Childhood and Gender in Time

CALL FOR PAPERS: Genesis on Childhood and Gender in Time

The journal Genesis. Rivista della Società Italiana delle Storiche calls for papers for a special issue dedicated to “childhood and gender in time.”

The nature of childhood and its significance as a separate phase of life are at the centre of a process of critical rethinking, which is generating new and challenging interdisciplinary research. We would like to explore the social construction of gender in childhood, from a transnational and interdisciplinary perspective, giving particular attention to the role of play, toys, and children’s literature. Our aim is to examine how gender norms and gender models have been formulated and propagated in different historical, geographical and cultural contexts, but also how those models have been appropriated, contested and possibly subverted. We are interested in the relationship between the effort of regulating children and the “agency” that children are able to express, particularly in the context of a children’s peer culture, in which play (broadly understood) has a central role.

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The Law and the Child in Historical Perspective, 1400-2000

CFP: The Law and the Child in Historical Perspective, 1400-2000 (June 1-2, 2014. University of Minnesota Law School)

The study of the history of children, youth and childhood has grown dramatically in the last two decades, making age a new category of historical analysis.  The Law and the Child will focus on law’s central role in changing understandings of childhood and children’s experiences, considering among other things selfhood, family, market relations, society, and state.  Our hope is for a broad reach geographically and chronologically, from the Medieval World to the Twenty-First Century, and for papers that consider the multiple sources that intersect in the legal construction of childhood and in children’s lived legal experiences.  These include race, class, gender, disability, sexuality, ethnicity, psychology, dependency, agency, citizenship, and (il)legitimacy.  We also hope papers will address topics in both civil and criminal law.  The conference, one of a series begun in 2007, is intended to showcase the work of junior scholars working the field of legal history and to bring them into conversation with senior scholars.  It is co-sponsored by the University of Minnesota Law School and History Department, the American Society for Legal History, the Indiana University Maurer School of Law, the Society for the History of Children and Youth, the Childhood and Youth Studies Across the Disciplines IAS Research Collaborative at the University of Minnesota, the University of Pennsylvania Law School and History Department, the University of Illinois College of Law, the University of Michigan Law School, and the University of Chicago Department of History.

Interested participants should submit a proposal of no more than 300 words, in Word format, accompanied by a cv of no more than 3 pages to Barbara Welke at welke004@umn.edu.  All proposals are due by 6 January 2014.  Applicants will be notified by email no later than 17 February 2014 whether their proposals have been accepted for presentation.  No previously published work will be accepted, as the conference is designed to provide a forum for productive and supportive discussion of works in progress.

Accepted participants will be required to submit a full paper, in Word format, of no more than 10,000 words by 1 May 2014.  All papers will be pre-circulated on a password-protected website, and read by all participants.  A modest travel and accommodations budget will be provided for all presenters.

Cute Studies

Call for Papers: “Cute Studies,” a special issue of the East Asian Journal of Popular Culture

Cuteness has a global reach: it is an affective response; an aesthetic category; a performative act of self-expression; and an immensely popular form of consumption. This themed issue of the East Asian Journal of Popular Culture is intended to launch the new, interdisciplinary, transnational academic field of Cute Studies.

Cute culture, a nineteenth century development in Europe and the US, with an earlier expression in Edo-era Japan, has flourished in East Asia since the 1970s, and around the world from the turn of the new millennium. This special issue seeks papers that engage with a wide variety of both the forms that express cute culture, and the platforms upon which its articulation depends. Thus, the field of Cute Studies casts a wide net, analyzing not only consumers of cute commodities, but also those who seek to enact, represent, or reference cuteness through personal presentation or behavior. Since these groups intermingle, cute culture may be seen as a type of fan community, in which the line between consumers and producers is continually renegotiated. Cute Studies also encompasses critical analyses of the creative works produced by practitioners such as artists, designers, and performers, as well as the circumstances that determine the production and dissemination of these works.

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Representations of Childhood in Comics

CFP: Representations of Childhood in Comics

Childhood is now widely recognized as a social construct (Fass, Jenks, Mintz). As the artifice behind the construction of childhood has been revealed, there has been a marked increase in the analysis of children and childhood in contemporary culture (Demarr and Bakermann, Edelman, Latham, McLennan, Renner, Stockton). Despite the increase in scholarly attention, depictions of childhood in comics and other forms of comic art are ripe for further study. The forthcoming issue of the Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics, focusing on comics, picturebooks, and childhood, should provide interesting insights into these depictions. Yet there remains plenty of room for consideration regarding how different comics construct childhood. This is an especially interesting area of inquiry given the somewhat vexed association comic books have traditionally maintained with childhood. In an attempt to continue developing the scholarly focus on childhood, as well as comics, we seek proposals for
scholarly articles that analyze, explore and interrogate depictions of childhood in comics or comic art for inclusion in a book-length anthology.

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Geographies of Children’s Health and Wellbeing in Urban Environments

Call for Chapters: Geographies of Children’s Health and Wellbeing in Urban Environments

Editors: Christina Ergler (Otago University), Robin Kearns (The University of Auckland) & Karen Witten (Massey University)

We are preparing a proposal for an edited book on children’s health and wellbeing in urban environments for consideration to the Geographies of Health series published by Ashgate Press and are seeking proposals for contributions.

Rationale:

Children shape and are shaped by the conditions of everyday life. How they experience, negotiate and connect with or resist their surroundings impacts on their health and wellbeing. For example, environmental pollution, changing service landscapes and chronic poverty in cities impacts upon children’s health and wellbeing in many different ways. Trends such as increasing educational demands and engagement with new technologies alongside declining independent exploration of local environments and loss of contact with ‘nature’ suggest that children are losing their attachment to places. Children’s social and mental wellbeing is also shaped in relation to different family or parenting situations and practices. In brief, children’s health and wellbeing in urban environments is multifaceted and complex, embracing diverse dimensions, structures and scales. While health and wellbeing is an underlying theme in many recent publications in children’s geographies and the sociological studies of childhood, in this edited book we explicitly adopt this important focus.

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Race, Crime, and Children

CFP: Race, Crime, and Children. Special Winter Issue: Red Feather Journal

In the wake of the tragic murder of Trayvon Martin, the young African American teenager killed as he was walking home in suburban Florida, the intersections of youth, crime and race have been brought to the forefront of public discourse and media scrutiny. In this discourse, American youth, and particularly young people of color, are frequently romanticized, demonized and/or criminalized. Red Feather Journal seeks to provide a forum for dialogue among scholars about the intersections of race, crime, children, and the media. How do cultural junctures like Trayvon Martin’s murder and racial profiling bring to the fore popular notions about childhood itself? What part does race play in constructions of, and cultural discourse about, childhood in a global context? Red Feather Journal invites the submission of scholarly articles from a variety of disciplines that explore these issues.

International submissions are encouraged.

Red Feather Journal adheres to the MLA citation system. Authors are welcome to submit articles in other citations systems, with the understanding that, upon acceptance, conversion to MLA is a condition of publication. Red Feather Journal is indexed through EBSCO host and MLA bibliography.

Interested contributors please submit the paper, an abstract, and a brief biography (with full contact information) as attachments in Word to debbieo@okstate.edu.

Deadline for submissions for the Special Winter issue is November 30, 2013.

CFP: Journal of Childhood and Religion

The Journal of Childhood and Religion, a peer-reviewed on-line publication of Sopher Press, provides an interdisciplinary forum for scholars representing a wide range of research fields, interests, and perspectives that relate to children and religion. Such fields may include but are not limited to religious studies, biblical studies, the range of human sciences, pastoral psychology, practical theology, pastoral theology, religious education, psychology of religion, sociology of religion, counseling psychology, social work, and cultural studies.

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Children and Slavery, Past and Present

Contributions are invited for a forthcoming volume, Small Bonds: Enslaved Children from 1607-2014, currently slated for inclusion in Cambridge’s new series, Slavery Since Emancipation. The essays in this volume will collectively ask how placing children in the forefront of our thinking can change our understanding of how slavery functions in both the past and the present.

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Translating Happiness: Medicine, Culture, and “Social Progress”

CFP: Translating Happiness: Medicine, Culture and “Social Progress”

This year the General Assembly of the United Nations (UN) proclaimed March 20th the International Day of Happiness. This day is premised on international recognition of the pursuit of happiness as a fundamental human goal, and a means of promoting sustainable development. International acknowledgement of the important role that happiness plays in development is also displayed in the 2012 World Happiness Report, as well as a host of recent changes to national social policies, community infrastructures and health services.

This special issue of Health, Culture and Society (HCS) explores the multiple and contested ways of knowing happiness. We are particularly interested in research that analyzes the translations of happiness. According to Nikolas Rose, translation provides for the possibility of government: “In the dynamics of translation, alignments are forged between the objectives of those wishing to govern and the personal projects of those organizations, groups, and individuals who are the subjects of government” (1999, p. 48).

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Depictions of Bullying in Popular Culture

Bullying has been a hot topic in recent years in terms of education, social media, and garnering awareness and protection of all persons from bullying. While being bullied or picked on used to be considered something of a rite of passage of elementary and high school, it is now considered a serious offense and can result in school expulsion and criminal charges. The scope of bullying within popular culture has also changed radically; depicting scenes in television or movies regarding bullying is now considered offensive and come with a warning at the start of an episode.

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CFP: Early African American Children’s Literature

Early African American Children’s Literature: An anthology of original essays

African American childhood in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries was a fraught proposition. On one hand, African Americans of all ages were infantilized by those in power. On the other hand, evolving constructions of childhood explicitly excluded African Americans: they were not cherubs dependent on motherly love, and they weren’t part of a private domestic sphere, and, the argument ran, they were never going to grow into self-sufficient adulthood. Perhaps it’s no surprise that we have not really thought about African American children’s literature in the years before 1900. Yet as scholars such as Caroline Lavender, Karen Sanchez-Eppler, Courtney Wiekle-Mills, Robin Bernstein and others have shown, literature about childhood and aimed at children were rich sites for conveying—and rejecting—vital concepts of personal and national development that would translate into ideologies of race, class, gender, sexuality and citizenship.

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CFP: Encyclopedia of Youth Cultures in America

The Encyclopedia of Youth Cultures in America to be published by M.E. Sharpe, seeks authors for the following entries: B-boy, Beat Generation,bobby-soxers, Bohemianism, Boys Towns, Candy Stripers, Central European Youth Groups in America, Deaf Culture, Factory Girls, Fetish Subcultures, Freak Scene, Greasers, Grunge, Gymnasts, Hackers and Hactivism, Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Youth Groups, Hipies, Hipsters, Homeless, Mod and Mod Revival, Muslim Youth Groups, Neo-Pagans, New Age, Otherkin, Pre-Schoolers, Psychobilly, Rednecks, Rockabilly, Rollerblading and Roller Derby, Runaways, Scandinavian American Youth Groups, Soldiers, Student Protest and Activism, Summer Camps, Tweeners, and Zoot Suiters.

Modest honoraria offered for entries from 500-3,000 words.

For information and inquiries, write Professor Simon Bronner at sbronner@psu.edu.

CFAuthors: Social History of American Families

The statistics tell the story of the American family: According to the
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 marked the milestone when blended families or
stepfamilies became the most common form of family in America; 2,100
new blended families are formed every day in this country; 41 percent
of unmarried couples living together have children living in the home;
over 65 percent of Americans are now a stepparent, a stepchild, a
stepsibling, a step-grandparent, or touched directly by a stepfamily
scenario. Moreover, the Pew Research Center reports interracial
marriages are on the rise in America—in 1980, 3 percent of married
couples were mixed race; today 1 in 12 couples are interracial
couples.

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Girls and Girlhood in Adaptations of Shakespeare

Call for Papers: Girls and Girlhood in Adaptations of Shakespeare
Special Issue of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation

The editors of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation, in conjunction with guest editor Deanne Williams, York University, extend a call for papers for B&L 9.2 (Fall 2014) on the topic of Girls and Girlhood in Adaptations of Shakespeare.

In 2012, the United Nations celebrated the first “Day of the Girl Child,” highlighting the treatment of girls and young women as the key moral issue of our time. As the advancement of girls becomes a global economic, medical, and social priority, literary scholars are turning their attention to cultural representations of and by girls and to historical and philosophical conceptions of girlhood. This special issue of Borrowers and Lenders initiates a scholarly conversation on girls and girlhood in adaptations of Shakespeare, seeking papers that address the process of adapting Shakespeare for girl actors, readers, patrons or audiences; adaptations of Shakespeare’s “girl” characters; and girls’ responses to and appropriations of Shakespeare. We encourage contributions that range from Shakespeare’s contemporaries and Restoration theatre to contemporary authors, playwrights, visual artists and directors, as well those that engage with newer or non-canonical literary genres such as online and Web 2.0 Shakespeares; fanfiction and the graphic novel; autobiography, memoirs and life writing; Shakespeare for children; and international, multicultural and postcolonial adaptations.

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Young People’s Materials and Culture

Call for Papers: Journal of Graduate Research in Young People’s Materials and Culture (JGR)

Based at the University of British Columbia the Journal of Graduate Research in Young People’s Materials and Culture (JGR) is a peer-reviewed open-access e-journal publishing graduate student research in the areas of children’s and young adult literature, childhood studies, and cultural studies related to children and young people.
We are currently selecting manuscripts for our winter 2013 issue. Papers on any children’s or young adult genres are welcome as are papers that discuss other children’s materials such as film, virtual texts, or graphic novels.

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Negotiations of Gender in Early Childhood Settings

Call for papers Special issue: Negotiations of Gender in Early Childhood Settings

The International Journal of Early Childhood invites researchers with different theoretical and methodological perspectives to contribute to a special issue on children’s negotiations of gender and normality in early childhood education. This is in order to develop an international research-based conversation on this topic. We welcome researchers from different geographical areas to contribute to this special issue.

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Call for co-editor for multi-volume primary source reader on 18th century British and American families

We are looking for a third co-editor to help gather, transcribe, and analyze primary sources about family life in 18th century Britain and America. We have a substantial outline for the series and are in advanced negotiations with the publisher. Since we are both junior faculty, we would prefer a more senior scholar, preferably one with a background in 18th century American families.

For more information please contact Amy Harris.

Amy Harris
BYU History Department
2130 JFSB
Provo, Utah 84602
(801) 422-6408